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Old 03-16-2017, 01:13 AM   #16
NWPhil
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shower door

Shower door openings require a minimum 22 clear opening. (UPC 408.5)

do yourself a favor and check your local building codes - if nothing else might come to "bite" you one day when you decide to sell the house.....
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Old 03-16-2017, 08:07 AM   #17
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Welcome. Please change your permanent signature line to a first name for us to use.

And please use the paper-clip icon above the Reply dialog box to attach photos from storage on your computer so they remain permanently in your post and don't disappear when you third party storage site changes the URL.

You can still expect a good deal of splash-out in that shower arrangement, but without knowing what your floor substrate will be nor your plans for waterproofing, we can't really address the extent to which that might be problematic.

I've done a number of showers in the configuration you show, but yours is a bit smaller than any of them. And I generally provide a 24" entry opening, which seems to suit all my customers just fine.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 03-16-2017, 01:11 PM   #18
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Welcome. Please change your permanent signature line to a first name for us to use.



And please use the paper-clip icon above the Reply dialog box to attach photos from storage on your computer so they remain permanently in your post and don't disappear when you third party storage site changes the URL.



You can still expect a good deal of splash-out in that shower arrangement, but without knowing what your floor substrate will be nor your plans for waterproofing, we can't really address the extent to which that might be problematic.



I've done a number of showers in the configuration you show, but yours is a bit smaller than any of them. And I generally provide a 24" entry opening, which seems to suit all my customers just fine.



My opinion; worth price charged.

Regarding splash out - I could put the shower head on the opposite side of where it is now. Directing the water to the tiled wall.

I'm planning on using the kerdi shower/drain system for waterproofing/drain slope.

It's not a big shower but I need to have a tub in there for resale value. It's an apartment and this would be the only tub.

I think the latest door system I've looked at has a 23 1/2" opening.

Thanks




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Old 03-16-2017, 07:25 PM   #19
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I've been reading that frameless shower enclosures can explode and it happens more than you'd think. Is this true?


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Old 03-16-2017, 09:32 PM   #20
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Any tempered glass can shatter (like car glass so its safer then float / window / annealed glass) when hit on the small edge.

Generally you can beat on the large flat side and nothing happens.

Its the edges you need to be careful of.
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Old 03-20-2017, 05:41 PM   #21
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Expansion gap on new subfloor section to be tiled over

I ripped out a couple sections of rotten subfloor in my bathroom remodel. There were two sheets of ply nailed/screwed to one another.

I am going to replace it with 2 sheets of similar thickness ply.

My question is how much expansion gap should be left at the joints - where one section of plywood touches another section of plywood. I've read 1/8" all around each piece of plywood. Is this accurate?

Should I leave that gap on both the first and second sheet of plywood?

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Old 03-20-2017, 06:17 PM   #22
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1- yes

2- Not sure what you mean. are these sheets offset layer to layer?
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Old 03-20-2017, 06:37 PM   #23
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yes on both layers. the theory behind this is it may not be necessary because when a house is built the sheets are "wet" and they shrink so there is no real chance of buckling. but if your floor gets wet that gap could save your tiles.

so you would be fine with a 1/16" but do the 1/8" for peace of mind.
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Old 03-20-2017, 06:59 PM   #24
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1- yes



2- Not sure what you mean. are these sheets offset layer to layer?


I would be laying the sheets right on top of one another. I wasn't planning on offsetting them.

I guess offsetting would make a stronger floor.


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Old 03-20-2017, 07:00 PM   #25
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.



so you would be fine with a 1/16" but do the 1/8" for peace of mind.

So if I have a rectangle leave 1/16" to 1/8" on all four sides of the rectangle?

Thanks!




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Old 03-20-2017, 07:02 PM   #26
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Offsetting greatly helps the floor. Read this article by our buddy Frank.
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Old 03-21-2017, 11:03 AM   #27
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Offsetting greatly helps the floor. Read this article by our buddy Frank.


Thanks. I'll have to read it again to truly understand it.




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Old 03-21-2017, 11:03 AM   #28
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Can I use these under a plywood subfloor? I need to boost a low spot. I don't want it deteriorating over time.
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Old 03-21-2017, 01:14 PM   #29
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I'll ask once again that you change your permanent signature line to a first name for us to use.

I know nothing about those shims, but if you need to change the support of your subfloor I'd strongly recommend you do it by sistering some 20by material to your joist to create that support.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 03-21-2017, 01:53 PM   #30
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I'll ask once again that you change your permanent signature line to a first name for us to use.



I know nothing about those shims, but if you need to change the support of your subfloor I'd strongly recommend you do it by sistering some 20by material to your joist to create that support.



My opinion; worth price charged.


Updated the signature.


When you say sistering 20by I'm guessing you mean 2x

When you sister 2x6 Or 2x4s to the joist is gluing and screwing enough of should I use lag bolts?


Thanks


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