Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-09-2017, 07:47 AM   #1
branimal
Jake
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 63
Advice on building stand alone tiled shower...

I am building a stand alone tiled shower.


It's a dual curb Corner shower.

(I am a DIY'r- but I'm a little handy and I have a tool budget since I'm doing this myself - this project is really about amassing a war chest of tools)



I've read up on a few options:



1. building a custom shower base : subfloor-->building paper-->metal lathe-->mortar-->CPE membrane-->mortar-->metal lathe-->mortar or some variation of this.



2. Dreamline prebuilt shower base -(CANNOT TILE) seems to get good reviews, but I have read that the base can feel spongy



3. TileRedi another prebuilt shower base (CAN TILE). Reviews are not that good and some are downright bad. Also heard the base can feel spongy which can lead to breaks in the grout. The wide range of sizes and drain locations seems appealing



4. Schulter-Kerdi shower kits... (CAN TILE) Good to great reviews. Can the Schulter-Kerdi 48 x 48 be cut down to 40" x 38" or am i limited to making square cuts on it. How can the foam possibly not give a spongy feeling?





Any advice is greatly appreciated.
__________________
Jake
branimal is online now   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 03-09-2017, 07:56 AM   #2
Carbidetooth
Hmmmmm
 
Carbidetooth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 841
I'd combine 1 and 3 and skip the foam receptor base. Surface applied membranes (like Kerdi) make most sense to me.
__________________
Peter
Carbidetooth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2017, 08:21 AM   #3
branimal
Jake
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carbidetooth View Post
I'd combine 1 and 3 and skip the foam receptor base. Surface applied membranes (like Kerdi) make most sense to me.


What don't you like about the foam receptor base? Thx


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Jake
branimal is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2017, 09:35 AM   #4
Carbidetooth
Hmmmmm
 
Carbidetooth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 841
Quote:
Originally Posted by branimal
What don't you like about the foam receptor base? Thx
They're expensive and rarely would fit the space in remodel situations. Cutting to size makes edges differing heights unless equal amounts are taken all around perimeter.
__________________
Peter
Carbidetooth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2017, 10:03 AM   #5
branimal
Jake
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carbidetooth View Post
They're expensive and rarely would fit the space in remodel situations. Cutting to size makes edges differing heights unless equal amounts are taken all around perimeter.
The kits costs about $500. Because I'm doing it my self I'm willing to eat that cost. I'm not sure I'm skilled enough do a custom install (option 1 above)

I can cut parallel lengths off a 39 x 39 prefabricated base to get it to fit.

The issue I'm struggling with is my shower space has a column in the corner so it turns the adjacent space into unusable space if I use the Schulter-Kerdi system. See pic upper right corner. Any suggestions on how to make that space usable? It's a 27" x 9" area.

Name:  22ab3529d4365eea1fc44ce88fe10bed.jpg
Views: 407
Size:  44.9 KB

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Jake

Last edited by jgleason; 03-12-2017 at 03:42 PM.
branimal is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2017, 10:35 AM   #6
Carbidetooth
Hmmmmm
 
Carbidetooth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 841
Where's your shower head? Valve?

I dare say you could do a mortar pan, many beginners have done it successfully.

Failing that, pehaps you just use the space in that area to recess a niche or two and keep the floor square.
__________________
Peter
Carbidetooth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2017, 07:19 PM   #7
Tiger Mountain Tile Inc
moderator
 
Tiger Mountain Tile Inc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Issaquah, Washington
Posts: 6,273
You could put a floating bench in where the ? mark is. That way you still have floor space and shoulder space in a smaller shower. I think Schluter makes foam extensions and if they don't there's other companies that have foam shower base systems that do.
__________________
Jim Upton
DIYTileGuy
Tiger Mountain Tile Inc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2017, 08:09 PM   #8
jadnashua
Veteran DIYer- Schluterville Graduate

STAR Senior Contributor

 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 11,483
Foam (and most other) shower bases are manufactured so that the outside edge is always level all around. Unless you cut equal amounts, one edge(s) will be lower than another. That allows the outer perimeter tiled edge to be perfectly level all around. Other than aesthetics, it has no functional imperative that dictates it must be level, but makes things harder, and some don't like the look (but, if you have a linear shower drain, the edges aren't level anyways). So, you can cut a foam pan to any size you want, but most people prefer to keep the edges level all around, so that takes a custom pan, most easily accomplished with a mudbed. Draw a level line all around, pack a rim of deckmud that is level at that line, then slope it to the drain. Deck mud is like working with wet beach sand that you pack into position. A little tricky, but not really all that hard. IT is heavy, and you don't have forever to work it, but it's not expensive and even if you make a few trial runs, it won't break the bank. Each one will get better and faster.
__________________
Jim DeBruycker
Not a pro, multiple Schluter Workshops (Schluterville and 2013 and 2014 at Schluter Headquarters), Mapei Training 2014, Laticrete Workshop 2014, Custom Building Products Workshop 2015, and Longtime Forum Participant.
jadnashua is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2017, 08:46 PM   #9
branimal
Jake
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 63
Advice on building stand alone tiled shower...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carbidetooth View Post
Where's your shower head? Valve?
I dare say you could do a mortar pan, many beginners have done it successfully.

Failing that, pehaps you just use the space in that area to recess a niche or two and keep the floor square.
The shower head and valve (knobs right?) will be on the same wall. See updated pic. I could put them on the wall with the unusable space as the pipes wrap around that way if that helps with a design you were envisioning.

Any recommended how to's on doing a mortar pan?


Thanks.

Name:  ec16fe67077fe075c6aeba64455c12f1.jpg
Views: 407
Size:  29.5 KB

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Jake

Last edited by jgleason; 03-12-2017 at 03:41 PM.
branimal is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2017, 08:47 PM   #10
branimal
Jake
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Mountain Tile Inc View Post
You could put a floating bench in where the ? mark is. That way you still have floor space and shoulder space in a smaller shower. I think Schluter makes foam extensions and if they don't there's other companies that have foam shower base systems that do.


I believe the bench needs to be inside the wet space. Meaning it has to be inside the Schulter curb. Correct me if I'm wrong.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Jake
branimal is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2017, 10:41 PM   #11
jadnashua
Veteran DIYer- Schluterville Graduate

STAR Senior Contributor

 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 11,483
If you're going with a linear drain, then a foam pan would work (although more expensive), since the walls would be sloped to match the pan anyways. Note, Schluter does make a SS trim piece that can make that neater, specifically for use with their linear drain pans. Also, their linear pans come already covered with the membrane, which eliminates a step. They had talked about doing that with their center drain pans, but I've not looked carefully for awhile.

A single slope is maybe easier to do than a bowl to a center drain when doing a mudbed - the whole thing is one flat plane.
__________________
Jim DeBruycker
Not a pro, multiple Schluter Workshops (Schluterville and 2013 and 2014 at Schluter Headquarters), Mapei Training 2014, Laticrete Workshop 2014, Custom Building Products Workshop 2015, and Longtime Forum Participant.
jadnashua is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2017, 10:49 PM   #12
branimal
Jake
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post



A single slope is maybe easier to do than a bowl to a center drain when doing a mudbed - the whole thing is one flat plane.

Good point... what are the toughest parts of doing a mudbed. Sounds like the drain location choice will make the job easier for a first timer.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Jake
branimal is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2017, 07:44 AM   #13
Houston Remodeler
Pondering retirement daily

STAR Senior Contributor

 
Houston Remodeler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Houston Texas
Posts: 27,264
The toughest part is getting over the fear of failure.

The materials are cheap, learning is priceless.
__________________
Paul1

For when DIY isn't such a good idea...
Houston TX area Kitchen & Bath Remodeling


http://CabotAndRowe.com
Houston Remodeler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2017, 05:53 PM   #14
branimal
Jake
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Houston Remodeler View Post
The toughest part is getting over the fear of failure.



The materials are cheap, learning is priceless.

I agree - but I have a deadline. First time diy'r


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Jake
branimal is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2017, 06:01 PM   #15
branimal
Jake
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 63
I changed the layout a bit swapping positions of the tub and shower. The tub now sits next to the column.

It allows me to install a slightly bigger shower.

Name:  af84a1c3ae94ae59609aee7cd71ff39b.jpg
Views: 341
Size:  44.4 KB


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Jake

Last edited by jgleason; 03-19-2017 at 10:48 AM.
branimal is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com   National Gypsum Permabase


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
HELP! The guy is tiling our bathroom now. Jimk75 Tile Forum/Advice Board 58 05-05-2014 01:12 AM
Tiling in bathroom jvandal Tile Forum/Advice Board 1 01-23-2010 08:12 AM
Tiling a Bathroom. Wow need HELP!! NotaPro Tile Forum/Advice Board 10 12-24-2008 09:22 AM
Bathroom Tiling StanJett Tile Forum/Advice Board 8 07-19-2008 11:31 AM
Tiling Bathroom jpgreen11 Tile Forum/Advice Board 3 02-24-2006 01:04 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:16 AM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2014 John Bridge & Associates, LLC