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Old 07-04-2017, 10:55 AM   #46
dave.adams
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This is the wall tile I'm looking at using. It says it is non-vitreous and has a water absorption rate of 7%. There seem to be mixed responses from the manufacturer on whether or not its recommended for shower wall use.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Daltile-M...210757&cj=true

Should I be concerned that it's non-vitreous, and look for a different option for shower wall tile? Is there a certain rating (impervious vs. non-vitreous) I need to be using in a shower application?

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Old 07-04-2017, 11:39 AM   #47
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Porcelain tile is a personal favorite, an absorption rate no higher than .5%
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Old 07-04-2017, 03:53 PM   #48
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So if that wall tile is at 7%, that's a definite no go for shower walls?


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Old 07-04-2017, 03:58 PM   #49
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It'll work, Dave, but you'll find porcelain easier to clean.
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Old 07-04-2017, 04:02 PM   #50
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It'll work, Dave, but you'll find porcelain easier to clean.


Good to know. But as far as function, I'm not going to be in trouble using that from a mold standpoint, or water absorption causing problems for the tile or something?

This is what I'm planning on for the floor.

https://www.tileshop.com/product/spo...ks&from=Search

I'm a bit confused as in the store, it was listed as approved for all applications but online it has shower pan and exterior uses crossed out.

Will this be ok to use on the shower floor?


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Old 07-07-2017, 01:12 PM   #51
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Good to know. But as far as function, I'm not going to be in trouble using a tile with 7% water absorption from a mold standpoint, or water absorption causing problems for the tile or something?
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Old 07-14-2017, 04:14 PM   #52
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I just purchased a kerdi shower kit, which included the presloped shower tray.

As I was looking at, it doesn't seem to have much of a slope. There is certainly some slope, and I understand water will always run downhill. But I understand that according to code, there should be 1/4 inch slope for every linear foot.

The edge of the tray is 1.5 inches high, and by that half-piece, it is 1.25 inches high. The length of that piece is about 30 inches. So given that the length of that piece of tray is 2.5 feet, shouldn't the necessary slope be 5/8 inch drop over that length? But instead it's 1/4 inch.

Am I overanalyzing here? I know these get installed all the time and are very reputable, but just wanting to make sure that I'm installing something with the necessary slope for the shower to drain properly.
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Old 07-15-2017, 01:15 PM   #53
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I just purchased a kerdi shower kit, which included the presloped shower tray.

As I was looking at, it doesn't seem to have much of a slope. There is certainly some slope, and I understand water will always run downhill. But I understand that according to code, there should be 1/4 inch slope for every linear foot.

The edge of the tray is 1.5 inches high, and by that half-piece, it is 1.25 inches high. The length of that piece is about 30 inches. So given that the length of that piece of tray is 2.5 feet, shouldn't the necessary slope be 5/8 inch drop over that length? But instead it's 1/4 inch.

Am I overanalyzing here? I know these get installed all the time and are very reputable, but just wanting to make sure that I'm installing something with the necessary slope for the shower to drain properly.
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Old 07-15-2017, 01:47 PM   #54
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I've never encountered one that didn't have the 1/4" per ft. Either you got a bad one or you arent measuring correctly. Try posting some pics and maybe we can help.
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Old 07-15-2017, 03:37 PM   #55
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I can take some pictures of the actual tray if that helps, but I thought perhaps the CAD sketch on the Schluter site might be useful.

https://sccpublic.s3-external-1.amaz...1152br_imp.pdf

When I spoke to a Schluter rep on the phone, I was told they decreased the slope on the offset tray so the slope on the short run from the wall to the drain would be less drastic.

On the CAD drawing, it looks like the slope on the long run is 1.1%, isn't the required slope 2%?
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Old 07-15-2017, 08:25 PM   #56
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IF the slope is perfect (possible with a manufactured pan), you can get by with less. Consider that in a drain, on pipes 3" and greater, they allow 1/8"/foot; on smaller diameter pipes, it's 1/4"/foot. This is one reason why it is critical to have your floor perfectly flat prior to installing the pan. On a mudbed, you can compensate, but you'll not get things perfectly straight, so 1/4"/foot is the minimum you should aim for.
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Old 07-15-2017, 08:38 PM   #57
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IF the slope is perfect (possible with a manufactured pan), you can get by with less. Consider that in a drain, on pipes 3" and greater, they allow 1/8"/foot; on smaller diameter pipes, it's 1/4"/foot. This is one reason why it is critical to have your floor perfectly flat prior to installing the pan. On a mudbed, you can compensate, but you'll not get things perfectly straight, so 1/4"/foot is the minimum you should aim for.


That makes sense. So can I just put a long level on the concrete subfloor, and make sure it's not slanted one way or other?

Or is there a more precise tool for ensuring it is perfectly level?


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Old 07-16-2017, 09:25 AM   #58
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So I checked the slab, and it is not level.

So I'm guessing my options are:

(1) use some sort of leveling compound and then set the tray in?

(2) just build the pan myself?

It seems like option 2 is the better one at this point because using some sort of leveling compound in there is not that different than just floating a pan myself with deck mud. If I float it myself I can just adjust it as needed on the high or low spots to give myself the necessary slope right?


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Old 07-16-2017, 10:07 AM   #59
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Yep, when you pack your own it doesn't matter how out of whack the slab is. It's cheaper too.
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Old 07-16-2017, 10:08 PM   #60
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If I'm just using bricks to build the shower curb, does it matter what kind of thinset and trowel size I use to attach bricks to slab and to each other?


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