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Old 04-16-2017, 09:00 PM   #31
workhurts
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Any reason to add a header. Perhaps a doubled up 2x4 header? Seems rock solid. I ripped a 2x6 down to 4.5" and nailed/screwed 3/4" ply at the back. This is my niche. Was thinking nailing/screwing cripples in would be sufficient.

There's gonna be additional wood pieces to create corners for the cement board to screw into so the whole thing is going to be even beefier. This is the wall the back of the floating bench will tie into.
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Old 04-17-2017, 09:50 AM   #32
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Is it a support wall, Ali?
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Old 04-17-2017, 12:31 PM   #33
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Nope. Not load bearing at all. The whole will be tiles so just need to make sure it doesn't move or sag. That niche opening is 63" wide and 12" tall.
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Old 04-17-2017, 12:49 PM   #34
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Then all you need is a top plate and some cripples far as I'm concerned.
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Old 04-19-2017, 07:48 PM   #35
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Thanks Everyone. Niche is solid as a rock. Bench doesn't look like it's going to be much of an issue after all.

I'm back to deciding on a linear drain and membrane. After giving up on making the drain flush with the edges of the wall I started looking at noble again. Pity their grates are kinda ugly but it won't matter if I tile in the grate. I like the fact that their troughs are pvc and don't use a no hub coupler.

Any major negatives in using noble over Schluter? Heck, the USG membrane is intriguing too. i think with a noble drain I can mix and match membranes as long as they are a certain thickness.

Any other linear drains that don't do the no-hub connector?
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Old 04-19-2017, 10:37 PM   #36
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Cast iron is still considered a premium drain medium, and the vast majority of it now is assembled with nohub connectors. IOW, they work. I wouldn't let that be a differentiator. SS is pretty robust stuff, but unless you leaded in the connection to CI, the nohub is the best way.
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Old 04-20-2017, 07:50 AM   #37
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I was leaning away from no hub because I was under the impression that clamps are ok if you have a way to tighten them every so often to keep them from loosening up. Absent a way to tighten they were also ok surrounded by earth.

My clamps would be below the surface of the concrete but nothing would actually be touching them. So can't tighten in the future and no material around them. Suppose I should research that more.
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Old 04-20-2017, 12:37 PM   #38
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Never have heard of the need for re-tightening no-hub connectors, Ali. I've been installing them for well over 30 years and have never had one loosen itsownself up at all, best of my knowledge. Maybe it takes longer than that?
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Old 04-20-2017, 09:14 PM   #39
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Do not confuse a metal reinforced nohub with an all rubber sleeve (which is only approved for underground use where it can be backfilled to keep the ends aligned. If you're worried, buy a torque wrench designed for them. If you get it torqued properly, it's permanent. Unfortunately, some of the drain suppliers include one of those all rubber sleeves, which would only work if it was say in a slab, and you could backfill around it...otherwise, on a subfloor, you are supposed to use a banded coupling. Getting the right one for the two different OD's may mean you won't find it at the big box store, but would either have to order one, or stop at a good plumbing supply store.
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Old 04-26-2017, 04:13 PM   #40
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Thanks CX and Jim. I probably was confusing things and the no-hub looks to be an acceptable solution.

Any opinion on slopes? I'm on a concrete slab. Custom Building Products has this thing called speedslope that supposedly can be feathered down to 1/8" or something like that. I've cut out about 9-12" on either side of the drain so can pack that to as thick as I want but short of jackhammering the entire floor, at some point I'm going to have a 'bed' that's 1/4" thick (about a foot away from the drain)

No curb, linear drain at entrance, slope goes away from the drain ...

A regular mud bed needs 3/4". Any great ideas are welcome.
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Old 04-26-2017, 04:25 PM   #41
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Not sure what you're looking for as far as ideas. Slope needs to be 1/4" per foot. Laticrete 3701 can be taken down to almost a feathered edge with a bonded bed over a slab I believe, you may want to double check with them on that.
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Old 04-27-2017, 02:31 PM   #42
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Thanks. Didn't see anywhere on the 3701 that you can go down that thin (or whether or not you should or anyone has experienced going that thin).

Also, how hard is this stuff to work with?

Just seems odd that these materials can magically go from nothing to a thick bed and I don't see much talk on here discussing them.

Thanks for posting an alternative. I'll give them a call.
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Old 04-27-2017, 03:07 PM   #43
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I've never worked with it, my information comes from a higher up at laticrete. Like I said give them a call and ask what the specifics are to get it to a feathered edge.
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Old 04-27-2017, 06:52 PM   #44
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I have found that just about any mud will feather down to near nothing as long as you have a bonder under it like thinset. That last 1/4 inch will be more thinset than anything else.
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Old 08-25-2017, 11:46 PM   #45
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Got a little sidetracked with framing, electrical, hvac and other plumbing on this basement. Back to my nemesis, the drain.

Do all areas of the shower have to be sloped towards the drain at 1/4" per foot. Obvious answer would be yes. If you recall, which I know no one will, I was doing a curbless with a linear drain at the entrance to the shower.

If I put the glass panel and door next to the drain, I adhere to the 1/4" rule because the 7' run away from the drain goes up 2". If I shift the glass partition and door 4-6" and slope that tile gently as an added safety measure I'm not sure whether that also has to be at 1/4".

With the door at the drain. Single slope. With the door slight away from the drain I'd have two 'wet' areas on either side of the drain but that 2nd wet area is just a precaution.
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