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Old 04-12-2017, 08:14 PM   #46
cx
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Actually, I think Herr Schluter does approve of pre-filling the the Ditra and the Ditra Heat mats. He would still prefer the mats be filled when the tile is set, but I don't think it much of an item for him at all. I believe he even agrees that the pre-filling can be done with modified thinset mortar if desired.

If Ryan has more current knowledge to the contrary, I'm sure he'll correct me.
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Old 04-12-2017, 08:26 PM   #47
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More current, no. But it seems like every rep. asked gives a different answer....
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Old 04-12-2017, 08:38 PM   #48
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Yeah, and that seems to have gotten to be much more of a problem for Schluter over the years, Ryan.
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Old 04-14-2017, 04:30 PM   #49
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FWIW, my tiler (who tiled two bathrooms for me using The Orange) prefers to burn the Ditra (fancy term for prefilling the indentions, knobs, whatever you call them) and then tile over that the next day. All seems fine with his work a few years later. Fresh thinset seems to stick fine to 'cured for about 12 hours' thinset.
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Old 04-17-2017, 06:40 PM   #50
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Ditra-heat wire install

Got the Ditra-heat wire laid in after a few in and outs of assorted regions of the room. It's not that big, but I wound up in the wrong direction a few times. 2 recommendations for those doing it for the first time... 1- count the studs and figure out the best way to get in an area and the out. I did a few variations of zig-zags so I could wind up in on one side and out on the othe and still have an alley to run the sensors through. 2- be careful with the meg ohm insulation test. That thing has a nasty bite! I'm sure the wire is not that delicate, but I was handling it like it was made of spider silk. Was concerned about the flexing causing it to break internally. Kept an eye on the ohm meter during this.
The Ditra-heat membrane is 1/4" thick and the junction connector to the cold lead is almost 3/8" at the thickest part. I don't think I have 1/8" thickness to bury it even if I dig out all the thinset after removing the Ditra around where it will be buried. I'm thinking of using a Dremel to dig out some of the underlayment plywood to make room. The junction will be under the vanity, so I could leave a gap in the tile, but my gut says "no". How do you guys handle the bulk of the junction?
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Old 04-20-2017, 07:43 AM   #51
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Since no one chimed in with any recommendations, I went ahead and dug out about 1/16" (maybe 3/32 in some spots) of the 3/8 plywood underlayment to set in the junction so it is flush or a bit deeper than the surface of the Ditra-heat. I'll cover these areas with Kerdi before tiling.
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Also the floor heating kit came with 2 sensors, one with the heating wire, one with the thermostat. They are two different types, the plastic cased one came with the thermostat.
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I hot glued them down and checked the resistance, both about the same at ambient floor temp (~11K), but the metal one was much quicker to respond to the hot glue (dropped down to about 5K). I guess its that the plastic is more of a heat insulator than a conductor. Are you all seeing both types of sensors?
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Old 04-20-2017, 08:21 AM   #52
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If you are confused about why there is 2 sensors, it's because 1 is a back up. It gets installed under the tile just like the other, then leave the wire in the box not hooked up to the thermostat. It is only hooked up in the event of damage or failure of the first one.
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Old 04-20-2017, 09:16 AM   #53
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Correct. I was just wondering why the different types. By design, or just from different sources? Going to Kerdi them over probably this evening and bury the wires in a coat of thinset. Hopefully floor tile this weekend.
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Old 04-20-2017, 05:00 PM   #54
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Looks good, Jeff! I think you're doing just fine.

My tile guy just embedded the "fat plug thingy" and set something heavy on it to keep it down while the burn in cured. He didn't dig into the plywood at all but ya gotta do what ya gotta do. I do think it is overly bulky.

I guess he lays a thick enough bed of thinset that the plug doesn't cause any issues.
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Old 04-20-2017, 06:06 PM   #55
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Covered the wires with thinset and kerdied over the buried electrical parts and against the floor curb junction.
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I was concerned about whether to fill the ditra or not before tiling (I call the formations in the ditra-heat "stadiums" because to me they look like miniature football stadiums or coliseums) but I only had mixed enough to do almost about 80% of the wires and the kerdi-band with a bag of Ditraset. For some reason I was expecting it to be smooth like pudding, but it's grittier than I was expecting. It's cement based, I don't know why I wasn't expecting it to be somewhat gritty. The bag called for 5-6 quarts of water, but I wound up with almost 8 to get "loose but still holds a notch" and even at that, it was a bit stiff. I used a plastic drywall spatula to work the kerdi-band into the Ditra and get it smooth without lumps and such. It really was much like doing the skim coat on the drywall. Since I used non-modified (I used the last of the Versabond under the Ditra) should I mist the exposed thinset for the first 12 hours or so, or just let it do its thing? I have 5/16" thick 13x13 porcelain tile, I'm thinking a 1/2 x 1/2 square notch trowel and 2 bags of Ditraset for 60 sqft? Thanks.
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Old 04-20-2017, 06:50 PM   #56
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No, I wouldn't wet it down.
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Old 04-24-2017, 05:26 PM   #57
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Column tiling opinion

I have a 4 1/2" square column on the knee wall of the shower (It's not a knee wall if its attached to a column, is it?) and it will be a support for the shower glass. It's 2 2x4 laminated to size to 3 1/2 x 3 1/2 with 1/2" drywall wrapped. Looks like this:
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Still needs Kerdi installed.
There's a bullnose in the tile style we're thinking of but it only comes in 3x6 with the bullnose on either the short or long side. On the short side, I could cut the tiles to the width of the column, but would have lots of short strips. If using the longer side, I'd have to then have an 1 1/2" sliver to wrap the column. Neither is a great look. Plus with the glass mounted, it would look kind of busy.
I was thinking of the options below: (yeah, my mouse & paint skills stink.)
Raw tile edge (I could smooth and somewhat polish, but they'd still look raw
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Mitering the back face of the tiles. I'd have to figure out to get a uniform grout line
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Using Rondec
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I'm leaning to #2 or #3. With the Rondec, I have a choice of Anodized colored aluminum or colored PVC. How does the aluminum hold up over time? I've have an aluminum shower frame upstairs that's always in need of cleaning the oxide off. Is the PVC more dent resistant, or just cracks if hit?
Anyway, your ideas are welcomed.
Thanks
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Old 04-24-2017, 06:22 PM   #58
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I'd either mitre, or use a profile. I like quadec personally but there are tons of options.
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Old 04-24-2017, 08:56 PM   #59
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What size are the field tiles that you'll install in the shower? What pattern? If you're going to use the Rondec on the column, I'd use it on all the shower edges. I'm not a big fan of the Schluter edges but that's just me. I'd use the bullnose tiles on all the edges.
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Old 04-24-2017, 09:04 PM   #60
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The field tiles are 10x14 and the bullnose are 3x10 or 3x6 with the bullnose on the long side, or 6x3 with it on the short side. I'd either wind up with a lot of 3 x 4 1/2 after cutting them down, or 3x6 with a 1 1/2 filler. I probably will look at some other tiles to see what the bullnose size availability is. When I get to the shower tiling, I'll play with the miter cuts. The Rondec/Quadec is always an option. It's not the tile that gets you, it's the bullnose.
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