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Old 06-19-2017, 11:44 AM   #61
evan1968
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Just mix it a bit stiffer.
Or, screed it in with the mix you have, then as it sets up and becomes stiffer, screed it down to the depth with the contraption I showed in the pics.
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Old 07-01-2017, 07:43 AM   #62
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South Florida Drop Down Shower

Question 1: I've had this question from the beginning and I'm pretty sure there is a good answer, I just can't think of it. My neo angle shower receptor is sunken into the slab and I'm not building a curb because the drop down is deep enough to serve that purpose. I would, however, like to use stone still caps to cover the edge but I'm not sure how to attach them to the subfloor. In the picture below you will see a couple of layers: slab, SLC, floor tile. This is where I want the cap to go and there will be a glass enclosure resting on it.

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Here is a crude mock up using a scrap from demo. Not pictured is the wall tile that will go on the inside vertical side of the drop down curb.

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So again, the question is how to attach given the sizable gap beneath the stone. My initial guess was to use bonded deck mud to fill the gap and pitch to the drain, then medium bed mortar to attach the still cap. Something tells me though that there may be a better way. Thoughts?

Question 2: When laying the floor tile I didn't do a great job at the edge because I didn't leave a gap. If necessary, I suppose I could use an angle grinder to grind away the Durock attached to the tub deck where it meets the floor. I was hoping that I can just not worry about it given that the floor is so small (65 sqft) and any expansion would be negligible. See pic below:

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Question 3: Poor measuring here. I was aiming to get this perfectly straight so I could butt a stone threshold against it. Now that it's down is there anything I can do? I have a 4 1/2" dry cut diamond blade for my grinder. Is it worth a shot using this to freehand cut the offending tile or am I likely to make matters worse? I cut a hole for the toilet flange using this method and the tile did not crack so I'm not too worried that the tiles will crack. Any suggestions?

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Old 07-01-2017, 05:49 PM   #63
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1- How did you waterproof your shower? Liquid membrane? Either way the buildup should be waterproofed as far out onto the main bath floor as possible. I prefer at least a foot, if not the entire bath floor.

2- How lucky do you feel ?

3- The tile on the far left should be under the door trim. Other then that , I'd be slapping down new tiles as the easier, neater route.
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Old 07-01-2017, 06:21 PM   #64
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1- yes, liquid waterproofing. I agree with waterproofing the buildup, just looking for some advice on what I should use for that buildup. If bonded deck mud is okay then I will pitch it to the drain and use the liquid membrane on top of that. I would think that if properly pitched, the waterproofing should not need to extend much beyond the wet area, which will end at the glass enclosure.

2- duly noted i will make an accommodation for this.

3- The door opens into the bathroom, so the bare patch of concrete is where the closed door will cover and where I want to put the threshold. The end of the tile on the left will be covered by the casing (which was removed for the install). No way I'm pulling up a 48" plank tile to correct this. If the diamond blade grinder idea is not good I'll guess I'll just live with it.


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Old 07-01-2017, 08:24 PM   #65
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1. I'd probably be using some bonded fat mud instead of deck mud to fill that void. Let it set and dry out, then use more waterproofing all the way to the bath floor tiles.

2. Use that grinder to open that up a little. Or, leave it alone, it's probably fine.

3.It doesn't need much trimming. If you can trim it straight, go for it. I doubt the tile will crack but it has to be pretty straight. If I was going to try it, I would hold down a piece of wood, like a 1x4 and run the blade against it. That way the blade has no chance of trimming too much.
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Old 07-01-2017, 10:01 PM   #66
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South Florida Drop Down Shower

Davy thanks for the fat mud tip. My only experience is with 4:1 deck mud for the pan. Here's what I think you're referring to:

https://www.quikrete.com/pdfs/data_s...3-50%20-76.pdf

Is that right? If so, I have a question regarding "bonding" to the substrate: With deck mud, I would just trowel out some thinset before packing in the deck mud. The instructions for the "Quickrete Wall Float" make reference to a specified "concrete bonding adhesive". In my application (bonding to concrete sub surface) is the concrete bonding adhesive the appropriate agent? Or should I use thinset as with the deck mud? Thanks!


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Old 07-02-2017, 09:11 AM   #67
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Yes, that's fat mud. I use a lot of that mud if I can find it. You can use it or make your own fat mud by mixing 4 parts of all purpose sand with 1 part of Portland cement and 1 part of lime. This mud needs to made a little wetter than deck mud but not runny. It will be stronger than deck mud and not want to break apart as easy.
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Old 08-26-2017, 10:41 AM   #68
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Does this also work as fat mud? I can't find the sakrete stuff anywhere.



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Old 08-27-2017, 08:41 PM   #69
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Yeah, I'm not crazy about it but it will do.
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Old 08-28-2017, 04:43 PM   #70
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I'm open to using other products if you have suggestions (that I can plausibly find at Lowe's/HD). I would however like to avoid mixing my own recipe. Also, will it bond to the slab or should I use a thinset or slurry to bond it down to the floor/curb (as one would do with dry pack)?


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Old 08-28-2017, 05:39 PM   #71
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You could use sand/topping mix, but you'd still need about 20 pounds of sand to each 60-pound bag.

If you're putting mud over a slab for a shower, you'll want to bond it with a slurry of thinset.
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Old 09-03-2017, 08:00 PM   #72
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Question for those who use the "notch the plastic drywall knife" trick to build up the thickness of the accent tile: I used a medium bed mortar for this (mapei LFT). It worked out pretty well and was less of a mess than I was expecting. However, once the thinset cured for a day or so, I put the knife back up to the wall and noticed that the mortar shrunk down a bit or maybe my knife technique was off (see pic). I would like to skim this with more mortar but the LFT will probably be a bit too bulky. I have some versabond thinset on hand that might do the trick. Is this an okay idea (skim with thinset to get the depth just right) or should I leave well enough alone? The additional depth I need is at most 1.5mm.
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Old 09-03-2017, 08:59 PM   #73
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If you really wanted to you could give it a shot, but it'll probably cause more harm than good. At this point I would just make up for it when setting your mosaics.
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Old 09-04-2017, 09:22 AM   #74
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Myself, I'd put another coat. It's hard to butter out mosaics and keep them flat and not have thinset ooze up into the joints.

When I skim coat behind the mosaics, I'll usually make two passes at it. A tile rubstone will smooth it out after it sets.

This is what I'm talking about. It's handy for rubbing down sharp edges and for smoothing out your mud. Rub it lightly with the stone.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/QEP-Tile-...022Q/100037081
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Old 09-05-2017, 07:09 AM   #75
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Thanks for the input. So would you continue with the mapei LFT or ideas the versabond thinset a better idea since it's such a thin skim? Or does it not matter?


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