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Old 05-01-2017, 10:00 AM   #16
rmckee84
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I'd reccomend abandoning the kerdi drain and looking up the divot method if you're going to use liquid waterproofing on the pan.
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Old 05-01-2017, 12:24 PM   #17
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What's the benefit of switching to the divot method? I was of the impression that this was inferior or at least not as popular. Will kerdi + liquid membrane be more likely to fail (properly installed, of course)? Thanks


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Old 05-01-2017, 12:33 PM   #18
rmckee84
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The kerdi drain body is made to work with sheet type membranes not liquid. Will it work with liquid, I have no idea. I wouldnt want to find out the hard way, I don't know of anyone that has tried using a kerdi drain and liquid on a pan.
I would suggest using whatever method aquadefense says. I doubt that would involve a kerdi drain. You can certainly try moving forward with your plan though it's up to you. I've certainly mixed products in the past but I do it confidently because I know how they work together and what their limitations are. The liquid+kerdi drain is a combo I haven't seen or heard of.
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Old 05-01-2017, 01:20 PM   #19
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What you're saying makes sense. At this point with the drain glued in it might be easier for me to switch to using a sheet membrane than to cut out and redo my drain. I've done that once already when replacing the original and prefer not to relive that experience.


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Old 05-13-2017, 08:05 PM   #20
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South Florida Drop Down Shower

Okay I've got the pan situation sorted out. I used a quick patch from Mapei for the deeper spots and a skim of versabond thinset to smooth out the rough areas resulting from my rudimentary steel trowel skills. I also dug out and redid around the drain due to some unwanted movement.
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Very happy with the results. I contacted Mapei tech team and was assured that the aquadefense liquid membrane was indeed compatible with the Kerdi drain. I went ahead with the application of the aquadefense per the provided instructions, using fiberglass reinforcing fabric in the corners. Thanks for all the feedback so far. Here's a pic of where I stand currently.
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I'm thinking ahead now to the bathroom floor area where I intend to use Mapei Self Leveler Plus to correct an out of level condition (about 5/8" in 7 feet) and to flatten the floor. The whole area is about 55-60 sqft. Questions:

1) will I be able to avoid most of the drama and heartache associated with SLCs by pouring enough to cover the entire floor (assuming I can get it all mixed and poured in under 10 min)?

2) under this scenario would I have to worry so much about surface tension and the pancake effect? In other words, Will I still have to be pushing it around with a spreader to get it real nice and flat?

3) How deep at the highest point? I've heard 1/8" and I've heard 1/2". Thoughts?

I'll likely have more detailed questions on this topic down the l road so any general thoughts on this would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!


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Old 05-13-2017, 08:54 PM   #21
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You'll find it easiest if you have the slc 1/2" above the highest point. You can feather it to zero over a slab, but YOU have to do it, it won't do it by itself and, you don't have all that much time to get it done. Think even a drop of water on a waxed car...it doesn't sheet, it pools. SLC is thicker.

Once your liquid waterproofing has dried the recommended time on for the material used, I'd seriously plan a flood test. While you may not notice a leak by water going somewhere, you should notice if the level drops. It's best to setup a control with say water in a baking pan or something similar...stack some coins to show the level. Both the shower pan and the control pan should evaporate at the same rate, so you can decide if there are any leaks.
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Old 05-14-2017, 09:08 AM   #22
Eric Woollen
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Yes I will be doing a flood test for sure. Thanks for the tip with the banking pan and coins. With the self lever: if I get it all poured within 10 minutes and I fill the whole room to 1/2" depth above the highest point, must I still worry about manually helping it find a level and flat surface? Or is this really only a problem when doing only a portion of a room?


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Old 05-14-2017, 09:22 AM   #23
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My experience with SLC as a complete novice was that once you got it to a reasonable minimum depth (~3/8") across the entire floor it pretty much took care of itself with just a little bit of pushing. I used a squeegee on a pole along with a very light touch to push a bit fluid into those few spots where needed. The pushing was entirely about redistributing the fluid around the room so it could level evenly on its own rather than trying to level it manually. I also found that so long as you keep adding more SLC on top of a still-wet previous pour it keeps the previous pour from solidifying so it kinda re-sets your clock a bit in terms of hardening time.

The real key for me was to work very quickly. Have a helper, use pre-measured buckets of water, use a timer when mixing, make darned sure you've got every last little thing prepped before you add water to the first bag of SLC, and while you're mixing have your helper push the slc to where it's needed.

In the end I was really pleased with how flat and level a surface I got.
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Old 05-14-2017, 04:57 PM   #24
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This makes me feel better. How many bags were you able to put down at once?


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Old 05-15-2017, 08:45 AM   #25
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I used 4 bags of Ardex Liquid Backerboard on a small bathroom floor (~50 square feet). I could have easily used more bags on a larger area since my helper and I developed a pretty good system of supplying buckets of pre-measured water. It also helped that I had a large mixing barrel since it allowed me to be less precise in adding the water and mixing (no splash concerns).
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Old 05-15-2017, 07:17 PM   #26
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Would you mind going into some detail as to the system you developed for not screwing up? I've been considering buying that large blue mixing barrel and would be interested to hear your experience with this. I anticipate using 6-7 bags to get to the required depth. Much appreciated!


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Old 05-15-2017, 07:32 PM   #27
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Eric,

Its pretty simple - be prepared.

1- Have one premeasured bucket of water for each bag of SLC
2- Do not re-use a bucket that SLC was made from. The old SLC will set off the new SLC
3- Have spare buckets of water for accidents, washing stuff
4- Have towels and sponges ready for accidents, washing stuff as soon as you use it. SLC sticks to screeds and levels very well
5- You'll get SLC all over the place
6- Work over a large thick tarp
7- Have help
8- Make a plan, communicate the plan to everyone
9- Once you start you cannot stop
10- set depth gauges ahead of time. When working over plywood, we set deck screws to depth. When working over SOG, we hot glue things to the floor
11- Use foam barriers around the edges, caulk all seams, dam all edges including around pipes.
12- mix your SLC as close to the area as possible. You have just a few minutes between mixing and pouring. You certainly don't want to be running through the house or up stairs.
13- have a shop vac handy to suck up the dust as you empty each bag.
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Old 05-16-2017, 06:29 AM   #28
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What Paul said...

My only difference was that I did use the same mixing barrel for all four bags of SLC. I didn't have any issues with that though.
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Old 05-16-2017, 07:23 AM   #29
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Warren did you mix each bag by itself? I was considering mixing 2-3 50lb. bags at a time in the big barrel (if I were to get one).


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Old 05-16-2017, 09:31 AM   #30
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I mixed one at a time. I'm a pretty strong guy, but I don't think I'd be very accurate when pouring out a barrel that weighed ~120 pounds (two 50 pound bags of mix + water + weight of barrel).
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