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Old 01-19-2018, 11:06 AM   #1
OttawaP
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Tile wheel, titanium vs carbide?

Does it matter much? which last longer for porcelain tile? The carbide wheel on my Sigma cutter is done but I'm not sure which to replace it with?

Thanks.
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Old 01-19-2018, 05:00 PM   #2
jadnashua
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From what I see on various charts, tungsten carbide is harder than titanium nitrate (and metallic titanium). As to it holding up as a cutter, don't know which one may be less likely to shatter, but the tungsten one is harder.
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Old 01-20-2018, 07:33 AM   #3
OttawaP
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Yeah it is harder...but more brittle. I think it micro chips along the point and eventually wears out. I'm going to try the titanium, I doubt I'll notice a difference.
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Old 01-20-2018, 10:40 AM   #4
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Titanium is mostly a wear resistance coating used on cutting tools. From my Manufacturing Engineers Bible (McMaster-Carr catalog):

Compared to high-speed steel end mills, carbide end mills are harder, stronger, and more wear resistant; however, they’re more brittle. The square-end cut style is good for milling square slots, pockets, and edges. All are center cutting, allowing plunge cuts into a surface.

Uncoated end mills are for general milling. TiN (titanium nitride) coated end mills last longer and can run at higher feeds/speeds than uncoated end mills. TiCN (titanium carbonitride) coated end mills have better wear resistance than TiN-coated end mills. TiAlN (titanium aluminum nitride) coated end mills are good for high-speed, high-temperature applications. Not for use on aluminum. AlTiN (aluminum titanium nitride) coated end mills are good for very high speeds/feeds and high-temperature applications.
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Old 02-05-2018, 09:21 AM   #5
OttawaP
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The titanium wheel was excellent. Time will tell if it has any long term quailites, but out of the box there was no complaints.
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