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Old 11-28-2017, 10:15 AM   #1381
Sharon @ LATICRETE
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Gary, as with any grout with a colored component, I'd recommend you dry-mix all the color component batches together before mixing the color component with the other components. With Spectralock that would mean dry-mixing all your Part Cs together before mixing any Part C with your Parts A and B.

I recognize that would mean you'd need to accurately estimate how much grout you'd need for the project before buying or mixing any of it, but that's just what you gotta do sometimes. Buying a little too much can be costly, but as you now see, buying too little can be more expensive.
Agree with CX - we always tell users to blend if they have mixed batches.
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Old 11-28-2017, 08:35 PM   #1382
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Originally Posted by CX
I recognize that would mean you'd need to accurately estimate how much grout you'd need for the project before buying or mixing any of it, but that's just what you gotta do sometimes.
I was misled by the numerous reports of color consistency for Spectralock -- I now suppose that meant within a batch, not from batch to batch. I knew I would need at least an additional mini (turns out I need just over 1/2 full) to complete. I should have ordered a full A/B, and two Part C's to begin with, then figured out how much more A/B to order.

Anyway, I took a shot and picked up another C locally, with a different date code (August). It matches the original June lot much better than the September (brownish) lot does. I'll mix up about 1/2 mini, using the rest of the June and some of the August lot, to use as a transition between 100% June lot and 100% August lot, and it will not be visible.
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Last edited by Atto; 11-29-2017 at 03:33 PM.
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Old 11-29-2017, 09:39 AM   #1383
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Gary, if you'll visit our FAQ you'll find a brief tutorial on how best to post and properly attribute quotes here on the forums. Very simple once you've seen it.
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Old 12-28-2017, 09:23 AM   #1384
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Iím wondering about best storage methods if I only need to use part of a full unit.

How should I store unused parts of A/B/C, and what is their shelf life if stored properly?

Thanks!


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Old 01-04-2018, 12:00 PM   #1385
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Stained limestone shower wall tile

First I would like to say thanks to all that give advice here. I have learned a lot.
The reason I am posting here is that I am suspecting that my issue may have something to do with the Spectralock grout used on the shower floor.

A little back round. I am a GC that has been in the business building homes and remodels for a long time. This was my first tile job. It was a complete master bath remodel.
A friend of mine with 40 years setting tile was my mentor and he along with info from this site was my go to for doing things right.

Well it looks like I didn't do something right and now have a problem to solve and correct.

The problem is the dreaded limestone staining on the shower walls at the bottom where the walls meet the shower floor.

The shower was done with Kerdi and the pan was Schulter foam pan.
The limestone was set with Versabond gray and the floor which was flat pebbles was set with Versabond white.

I didn't realize that the owner would choose a pebble style floor tile until after the pan had been installed. My research told me that may be a problem and that is how I got to this thread to start with and decided that an epoxy grout would help mitigate any structural problems. So I went with Spectralock Pro grout for the floor. Waited 2 weeks or more before doing the grout. I followed the instructions to the letter and it came out great. It was 10 days before and water was put to the floor and that was to satisfy that the floor would drain right. The shower itself was not put into service until at least a month after the floor grouting, maybe more than that.

So everyone is excited that the job is finally done and the owner starts to use the shower for about a week and then calls me to say there is a problem and that there is what looks like a water stain along the bottom 3 to 4 inches up
on the limestone tile. At first the husband thought is was just the tile getting wet and it was normal. His wife disagreed and unfortunately she is right.
The dark wet color is not going away. She did some research and the first speculation is a reaction between the grout and the limestone.

I should add that the limestone was sealed with an impregnator sealant on the surface before the floor grouting.

To be clear I am not blaming the grout, but just trying to figure out what has happened so that after it is corrected it does not happen again.

I have done a search into limestone staining here on this site and read several threads regarding this problem, which I now realize is somewhat common. To be fair I did question the owner on choosing limestone for a shower. She was of course assured by the retailer that is would be fine as long as it was sealed. I just wish I had done a little more research and read some of the horror stories that I have now read. That being said, my friend with 40 years experience took a look at it and said he has never seen anything like this and has done a lot of limestone in his time. The difference being he is old school and does everything in mud.

I would add that tile does not feel wet and you can close your eyes and feel with your hand where this stain starts and stops. It is very subtle, but I am sure I can feel a very slight difference.

I will get some photos and post them up
Thanks , Mike
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Old 01-04-2018, 01:10 PM   #1386
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Depends on what limestone they selected. We had a distributor years ago do a big push on limestone in wet areas and said "just use this miracle stone sealer" and you will be good to go. Didn't quite work out that well. What I have learned over the years is limestone is great for non wet areas. Not so for wet areas. It may not be the grout. Its probably the material.
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Old 01-05-2018, 07:47 AM   #1387
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Hi Fletch, Welcome to the forum.

I think Dave is right. Limestone has no place in a shower as far as I'm concerned. Marble doesn't either, but at least marble doesn't suck up as much moisture as limestone.
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