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Old 12-05-2017, 05:51 PM   #16
stu rosen
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Yes-There is an ongoing debate about sealing shower stalls. Lets look at the performance of an impregnating sealer. "To temporarily inhibit the intrusion of staining agents from the surface of the stone"
Thats it-pretty much. If you have a sound installation and have specified stone that works well in a wet environment do you need a sealer?
Anyway you can try the iron out poultice or use ammonium thyioglycolate which is quite good at removing oxidation. It sells under the name of RSR2000 or Margel. Read directions and understand unless the water is mitigated the oxidation may return with vengeance.
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Old 12-05-2017, 09:18 PM   #17
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@Stu Thank you. I will look further into these products. Is there a way to remove the sealer? I'm guessing not, since it's absorbed into the marble.

@Bubba I already received the cheap moisture meter thanks to Amazon. The shower floor read 100% moisture no matter the location I place it - see pic. The maximum penetration of the meter is 3/4". The marble flooring outside the shower read between 50-90% moisture depending on location. Do you think the more expensive meter you suggested will add much value? If so, I will purchase it.
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Old 12-06-2017, 09:22 AM   #18
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Hi Joey,

I don't think you've removed the trim plate from the valve, and I think you should do that and try to evaluate how the walls were done. Like Bubba, I also think your shower floor is done with mortar right under the tile with a shower pan below the mud. That could be causing some or all of the problem.
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Old 12-06-2017, 09:05 PM   #19
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Texas...yeah, in Texan speak, that’s “a ways”.

I don’t think the more expensive meter is going to be of more value to you. I think you’d be wasting money if you bought it.

Call up the manufacturer and ask what is most effective on stripping your sealer. Stu may know outright. If I clean a tile install that has a sealer with a high alkaline cleaner, I usually assume I’m degrading the sealer. But I don’t know the percent of degradation.

If it were me, I’d strip the floor sealer and see if the staining stopped getting worse. Then I’d consider leaving it be or possibly replacing a few tiles (if I was certain it was a traditionally built shower without a layer of surface waterproofing).

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Old 12-08-2017, 09:12 PM   #20
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Ok, I removed the trim plate and took some photos. I don't know much about shower construction so hopefully you guys can help. Please let me know if you need different photos / angles.

I also called up Stonetech to see what product to use to strip the sealer. I'm waiting to get confirmation. Based on the photos and the isolated locations of the yellowing, they think it's likely caused by moisture issue beneath the stone.

Is there any non-destructive way to see how the floors were constructed?
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Old 12-09-2017, 04:30 AM   #21
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No way to get to the floor without some demolition that I know of.

I can't tell for sure how the walls are done. Looks like possibly some kind of fiber cement board behind the tile, but the access to it seems pretty small, and the pictures are very close-up.
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Old 12-09-2017, 09:34 AM   #22
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If I had to guess, looks like Hardi board on the walls.
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Old 12-09-2017, 10:24 AM   #23
stu rosen
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Yes-I think just using a high alkaline cleaner will degrade your sealer pretty well.
Abrasion using a diamond impregnated pad will also strip off the sealer as long as the pad you use is 220 grit or less. Of course paint stripper containing methylene chloride will always work.
Not sure I would worry about the existing sealer at this point. Maybe just dont add anymore. My suggestion-your oxidation while probably annoying may not be solvable. It also may not get any worse-if it does you can replace those tiles. White marble is just a crap shoot in a wet environment. The nature of the stone cant really be altered.
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Old 12-10-2017, 05:08 PM   #24
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Thanks everyone. Here's my game plan, please let me know if acceptable:

1) Use StoneTech KlenzAll high alkaline cleaner to try and degrade existing sealer. https://www.amazon.com/StoneTech-KA1...etech+klenzall. I will test on spare tile first. I'm also still waiting to hear back from the manufacturer to make sure this is the best product to use.

2) Try Iron Out poultice to remove rust or oxidation on stone. If not successful, try Margel to remove oxidation. I will test on spare tile first to make sure it doesn't cause more damage. I heard Margel turns the stone purple but clears up over time.

3) Recaulk the shower floor to ensure water will not penetrate through the change of plane joints.

4) To avoid exacerbating the moisture issues, I will run exhaust fan during and after shower for 20 minutes. Use a squeegee to remove moisture on walls. Towel dry the shower walls and floor. Maybe use a small dehumidifier.

5) If marble continues to oxidize and spread I will try and work with the builder to fix the issue or hire a contractor to help.
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