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Old 11-03-2011, 02:54 PM   #1
olgade
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Overcut door jambs

Hi, guys:
Hope to get an advice on the best way to deal with the self-created problem. I have recently done my first floor tiling job. In the process I overcut the door jambs (there are 3 doors in the area: 2 entrance doors and a bathroom door), so I have got an about 1/4" gap between the jambs and the tile. I have tried to cut thin pieces of molding to slide them under and glue them, but the pieces are so thin that they break on cutting all the time. On another forum, I read a post where it was recommended to cut the casings further to up to 1" gap and then insert pieces. However, I believe that the cut-off line would be very noticeable as my door jambs are stained (dark stain), not painted. I am thinking about filling the gaps with a wood filler, finding a paint that is close in color to the door jamb stain (as wood filler does not take stain very well) and painting the jamb ends when the wood filler hardens. As the painted surfaces will be just 1/4" from the floor, I expect that the color difference/absence of wood grain will not be very noticeable. I am reluctant to tear off all the casings as is recommended on the other websites: it is a lot of work and provides another opportunity to do something wrong. Is there another way to fix this problem? I would really appreciate all the advices I can get.
Thank you all in advance. Olga
PS. By the way, if I use the method described above (wood filler/painting), can I fill the gaps completely, from the tile to the wood, or should I still leave some space and fill it with caulk? If the space is needed, then what would be the best way to do it (maybe, inserting a putty knife covered with plastic food wrap before applying wood filler)?
Thanks again.
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Old 11-03-2011, 03:11 PM   #2
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The 1/4" gap exists after the tile has been set, right?

You don't what to do what I would suggest, which is to replace the jambs.

I like the filler/paint idea, but I would do it differently. I'd find a paintable caulk that is close to the base color of the wood, slightly darker would be OK. Paint the caulk, then using paint or even a sharpie, add some grain lines, sort of faux finish.

I suggest caulk because you can caulk to the floor and that would help the patch stay in place.
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Old 11-03-2011, 03:37 PM   #3
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Depending upon the situation, if there is a color-match caulk for your grout, it might look good enough to simply fill the gap with that caulk (especially if you do NOT have tile already installed UNDER the door jamb.
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Old 11-03-2011, 03:54 PM   #4
Splinter
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1/4" thick slice of wood? Shouldnt be a problem... I wouldnt replace an entire jamb for a 1/4" screw-up, that's ridiculous. If the wood you're using breaks easily, try something different. Poplar is harder and holds up well... Maple also... Use a sharp blade, not the one that's been on your saw in the garage for the last 20 years.

No one will notice a seam 1/4" off the floor... especially on a dark stain.
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Old 11-03-2011, 05:43 PM   #5
olgade
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Everyone, thanks a lot for your advice. The tile is under jambs, that is why I cut them in the first place. I already thought about filling it with caulk, but I just did not quite like that it will stay soft forever and could be dented so easily. I did search around for the color-matching caulk, but the darkest brown color I could find is still lighter than the wood stain, so painting will have to be done. For wood slices I used the same wood the casings are made of (i. e. pine). It is a good idea to try poplar, I shall certainly look into it. I just came up with a variation of filler/paint approach; to put first a thin layer of tile-colored caulk and when it cures, use the filler between the caulk and wood, then paint. This will provide the expansion joint.
Thank you all again. If someone has other ideas, I would be very-very happy to hear them. Olga
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Old 11-03-2011, 06:58 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by olgade
I did search around for the color-matching caulk, but the darkest brown color I could find is still lighter than the wood stain
The idea wasn't to match the color of the door frame, the idea was to match the color of the grout. Under the right conditions and angle, the grout color will look like a tile seam rather than the bottom of the door jamb.
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Old 11-03-2011, 07:47 PM   #7
dhagin
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Not sure how it will look, or if it's possible without seeing what you have, but maybe something like this.

http://www.google.com/search?q=plint...DJKaXmiAKYsuxm

Cut the bottom of the door casings up and put a block under them each. You can put them at the tops too if you'd like. The best part: call it a 'feature', not a screw up.
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Old 11-03-2011, 08:03 PM   #8
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Plinth blocks might work fine on the casings, Dana, but I thought we were talking about the jambs here.

Wouldn't work so well if there's a door involved, eh?
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Old 11-03-2011, 08:20 PM   #9
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Oh.

Name:  never mind.jpg
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Never mind.
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Old 11-03-2011, 08:25 PM   #10
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I did that once and took the 3/4" piece that I cut off and ran it thru the table saw making it 1/4" lets say. Then elmers type wood glued on the op, swizzled it into place with a thin putty knife blade underneith and let it firm up before pulling the knife out, looked great on the door jamb portion. The trim took more work to look great but it was do able.

If you saved the cuto-offs, your part of the way there.
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Old 11-04-2011, 09:42 AM   #11
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Filler and paint would be the best idea. You have to remember that people are only going to be able to see it from standing level, and at an angle , so it doesn't have to be picture perfect. Hopefully, people will be spending more time noticing your beautiful tile work!
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Old 11-10-2013, 07:36 PM   #12
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I may have a good alternative for this. Google casing kickers and see if that is a good option.
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Old 11-10-2013, 08:17 PM   #13
ceramictec
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Wayne, nice Idea you made there.

http://casingkickers.com/

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Old 11-10-2013, 08:23 PM   #14
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Welcome Wayne.

You do realize this thread is a couple years old and has likely all been resolved by now.

And we appreciate any time a manufacturer is on board here, but we do also require full disclosure of any affiliation you may have with the company or products you recommend. Thanks.
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