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Old 04-09-2012, 12:23 PM   #601
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emil
Please can out outline your recommendation with a rationale.
Thanks, I needed that. I know you didn't mean it to be funny, but the rest of the Pro's here who know CX will also get a chuckle out of it.

Many folks get the idea that moisture can wick up the ceement board and into the wall cavity and they are correct. A small amount may do that, but in a properly constructed shower, this isn't a problem. While many Pro's do nothing to the bottom edge of the ceement board, I don't see anything wrong with coating the bottom edge of the cbu with redguard. Then this begs the question; should you redguard the backside of the CBU between the cbu and the liner?
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Old 04-09-2012, 01:08 PM   #602
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I am opposed to using the liquid applied waterproofing membrane or silicone or any other product on the bottom edge of the CBU in that application, Emil.

If you have no standing water in your shower pan at the walls you will have no wicking up the CBU walls.

If any moisture should get into your CBU wall panels, it will want to use your previously installed gravity to exit out the bottom. You want to allow it to do that.

Rationale? We don't need no steenkin' rationale! Emil, we're running an Internet site here. That's a place where people not known to you pose as experts and say the first thing that pops into their head.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 04-09-2012, 02:08 PM   #603
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Paul: Yes, to be consistent.

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Old 04-09-2012, 02:21 PM   #604
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But then if you are 'dipping' the cbu into redguard you are creating a moisture sammich. By leaving the cbu bottom and back alone, you allow the cbu to breathe.
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Old 04-09-2012, 05:13 PM   #605
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PauL thanks for your rationale.

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Old 04-09-2012, 05:44 PM   #606
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Paul: I do not think there will be enough water to wick up the board. There will be enough water to make the board damp.


Perhaps a border of tile around the bottom perimeter of the tiled walls would give better sealing.

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Old 04-09-2012, 08:18 PM   #607
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emil
Perhaps a border of tile around the bottom perimeter of the tiled walls would give better sealing.
Don't think I understand that, Emil. You did not intend to tile around the bottom perimeter of your shower walls?

The tiles never play any part in "sealing" or waterproofing the shower.
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Old 04-09-2012, 09:49 PM   #608
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Hi Emil, I'm glad you are making progress on your shower despite the other things that life has thrown your way.

It's my opinion that redguarding the bottom and inside of the cbu is over-thinking and overkill. It goes beyond the TCNA requirements and may have the unintended consequence of creating the much dreaded moisture sandwich.

However, with that being said, if this is something that is important to you, I would think redguard or maybe even wrapping tar paper around the bottom of the cbu?

Anyway, if you don't post for a while, we understand you may have other things going on.
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:22 AM   #609
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Jim : Thanks fotr your remarks. I do not want to create a moisture sandswich. I will use Redguard on the front of the board not the bottom edge or the back.


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Old 05-15-2012, 09:25 PM   #610
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I have installed the CBU and used tape plus thinset to seal the seams in the board.

I intend to form the curb with "fat mud" before I mud the shower (to create the floor).

At an ealier date I received advice from Jim out in Washington state. I reproduce his drawing below. I want to make sure I am in interpretiing correctly. So I have added what I consider what I think is the "outside" and "inside" of the shower. Yes?

I am interested in the height of the lathe inside the shower. It is shown, I think, above the floor (and curled back a little) in Jim's drawing. In my case then in the inside of the shower the lathe will sit a little above the shower liner. So keeping in mind that the mud floor will be put in place after the curb is formed then my question is how high should the lathe be above the liner. In the next step when the mud is added to create the shower floor the mud height at the curb will be ~ 1 3/4" above the liner.

Please can you comment,

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Old 05-16-2012, 12:11 AM   #611
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Hi Emil,

It's nice to hear from you. You've interpreted the drawing correctly. The reason that I run the "end" into the shower is that it usually is easier to fold it into the shower mud than to cut it off. But I usually do the pan first and the curb second.

The curled end can touch the liner, but you have to watch very closely that there are no sharp points that will puncture. If there are you have to make sure to fold them up and back away from the liner.

The lath is a little bit tricky because you want it to tie into the shower pan (if you are doing the curb first and the pan later), but you don't want it to stick up so that you can't keep it down when you are doing the mudwork and you also want to get enough mud underneath it.
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:01 AM   #612
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CURB FORMATION

I will be forming the curb prior to creating the mud shower floor. The mudding of the floor will be done some days after the curb is formed.

Thanks Jim: I am working with the metal lathe now and getting a feel for it.
I have studied your directions most carefully. I note that you screw a piece of backerboard (1/4 ")to the front of the lathe-curb. {I am wondering whether at this stage you also apply some fat mud to the lathe-curb prior to attaching backerboard?}

The height of this piece of backerboard should be above the height of the lathe around the curb top. It is used as a screed when forming the top of the curb. I am wondering how thick the fat mud should be on the top )would it be 3/4" thick?

I think some people uses pieces of wood cut to size to assist the fat mud level being established at the curb. Possibly a grout float is usesful for squashing the fat mud into the lathe. I do have a small table saw so I could make such pieces if needed. So suggestions are welcome regards using wood to assist with curb formation.


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Old 05-16-2012, 12:11 PM   #613
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CX: I looked back at your advice on curb making and I have studied the article of John Bridge on this topic. I note that you recommended using fat mud for the entire curb. Threfore to use fat mud for the front instead of using a piece of backerboard (1/4") on the front as used by Jim. Could I ask you why you prefer the fat mud and also what thickness of fat mud over the metal lathe should one achieve to constitute the curb. I am intrigued by this point since I think that the backerboard on the front would provide a nice job.


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Old 05-16-2012, 04:38 PM   #614
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MASONRY CEMENT FOR CURB FORMATION

Another consideration relevant to moving this work forward is to get some masonry cement (portland cement plus limestone) as recommended by moderator Bob. J.B in his curb article has recommended buying a product already mixed with sand, since this is much more convenient.

I have tried Home Depot and Lowes but so far I have unearthed only products e.g Quickrete Masonry Cement that you have to mix with sand. Does anyone have a recommendation for such a product,

thank you,

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Old 05-16-2012, 06:04 PM   #615
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Home Depot will have Quikrete's Mason's Mix, Emil, which will do fine for your curb.

I don't favor trying to use a CBU as part of the curb because you end up with a cold joint and lack of continuity at the top of the curb where the CBU meets the fat mud. No advantage at all to that and clearly a potential disadvantage.

You want the mud on your curb to be a minimum of about a half-inch thick. The top can be filled in some later if necessary to accommodate your tile pattern front and back.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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