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Old 12-14-2017, 06:48 AM   #3
Gozo
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Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Central Virginia
Posts: 175
The smoking when cutting usually has to do either with the wood being pinched and twisted by the torque of the blade against the line of travel. Almost a given with a hand held circular saw doing a bevel. If using a compound miter saw and the work piece is clamped in well and the saw pivots are not loose, it may be because of the blade type. The gullet has to get the sawdust out of the cut before the next tooth gets in there. Some blades (coarse) are designed to move material faster and some slower. The right blade at the right speed kind of thing. Also if youíre making a plunge bevel cut the blade is cutting a longer section of wood than if youíre making a sliding bevel, though the plunge is for a shorter travel distance through than the slide cut. Smoking usually tells me Iím not doing something right (or maybe just a sappy piece of wood).
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Jeff
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