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Lilmiss3
05-29-2011, 07:34 PM
I am tiling a shower (surround of a tub). I need to make a final decision re: just grout everywhere and then seal it, or to caulk in the corners (and possibly where the tile and tub meet?). My general contractor friend who did the backerboard install for me said sealed grout alone everywhere is fine. But, as I've searched on the 'net, I see most folks (DIY'ers, contractors and other tile and home improvement experts) are in favor of CAULK IN THE CORNERS (or wherever there is a change in the plane of the tile) and GROUT EVERYWHERE ELSE. The advice is to grout first, leaving the corners bare so you can caulk in the same color....

What's the word here???

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tile dummy
05-29-2011, 07:42 PM
Caulk will be the most durable in the corners and where the tile meets the tub and you should try and get the color you need in 100% silicone.

Lilmiss3
05-29-2011, 10:12 PM
So, it doesn't look weird where the two mediums intersect....??? I would think it would, since every caulk I've seen and used is shiny, and grout is NOT....

TileArt1
05-29-2011, 10:44 PM
What looks more weird is cracked grout in the changes of plane. :D All changes of plane should be caulked or siliconed due to movement of the different planes in different directions. Grout cannot handle the stresses of the movement - silicone can.

Many manufacturers make matching caulk or silicone for their grouts.

Crestone Tile
05-29-2011, 11:56 PM
Roger is right. However ...

I think all manufacturer color matched acrylic caulk is pretty much crap. If had to pick one to use, it would be Laticrete, but I don't use much of their grout. And even if I did, I would still make my own silicone color-matched on site.

I've got it down to where it looks very near the actual grout used (epoxy, urethane, or cement ... doesn't matter), has significantly less shine to it than the manufactured stuff like Latisil, and will outperform any of the acrylics out their.

If you can't mix your own, try out Earthmaster Groutmatch. It's a good system and is the best route to go for a purchased product in my opinion. The finished material is MUCH truer to the actual grout than any of the pre-manufactured stuff out there.

Jim Farrell Tiler
05-30-2011, 12:29 AM
mapei is the way, they have a silicone for every grout colour, at least here in the civilised part of the planet:tup1:

Davy
05-30-2011, 05:46 AM
If you go by the book, caulk is recommended. Depending on your installation type, the grout my crack if used in the corners. Caulk will have to be replaced every few years also. So unless you have a mud job with lath wrapped in the corners, it's best to caulk them. Always caulk at the tub, it will move every time.

Raymondo
05-30-2011, 07:25 AM
We usually grout everything, including the corners, and then caulk with clear 100% silicone over the grout in the corners. Looks really good and consistent. The caulk does make the joint appear a bit shiny compared to the rest of the grout... Anyone know of a 100% silicone that's clear but has a matte finish?

TileArt1
05-30-2011, 07:46 AM
Matt's right, the color matched acrylic caulks tend to dry out and crack as well, although they are easier to replace then cracked grout.

Laticrete makes colored silicones, that would be my first choice. Mapei and custom also make color-matched silicones

WendyHMN
05-30-2011, 08:26 AM
Here (http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/showpost.php?p=1044977&postcount=277) is a pic from my shower where I used Spectralock grout and latisil at the plane change from wall to ceiling. I have noticed some extra shine in spots like the wall-to-bench turn where the light hits directly, but not enough to bother me. Spectralock has a bit of shine itself.

Lilmiss3
05-30-2011, 08:35 AM
I really appreciate everyone's comments and suggestions, and even though it's clear to me now that I should caulk in the corners and at the tub, I'm not thrilled about it.... replacing the caulk every few years is something I was trying to avoid!!! I had just re-caulked the tub a few months ago, in efforts to eliminate a mold problem, and ended-up with mold coming through from behind in less than a month anyway! That is what led me to just tear the entire thing out (except the tub) and start over.

Does any of your suggestions matter to know that this is a reno around an existing tub and all old drywall and cultured marble was torn out and replaced with concrete backerboard, covered in Red Gard to waterproof....??? Still say I need to caulk the corners and at the tub...???

Lilmiss3
05-30-2011, 08:38 AM
Casey said they usually grout the entire area and use a clear silicone OVER the grout.... I had read that was not a good idea, because you're not allowing moisture to escape and are creating a prime situation for mold growth....??? Again, mold growth is what caused me to rip the old shower out and start anew so avoiding this problem in the future would make me one VERY happy girl!

jgleason
05-30-2011, 09:15 AM
Hi Lynn,

100% silicone at the tub to tile joint is your best bet. I wouldn't grout and add silicone, just the silicone is needed.

Your cement board and RedGard is good and you bring up an oft-debated point regarding water migration and what happens when it gets "trapped" at the caulking joint. Leaving a few openings in the silicone joint is an option.

Lilmiss3
05-31-2011, 02:17 AM
Thanks SO much for your help, everyone. This forum ROCKS! :yipee:

Lilmiss3
05-31-2011, 10:53 AM
Am wondering what folks think of Grout Shield's Grout Additive, which is mixed with grout instead of water, and is supposed to forgo the need for sealing the grout afterwards. Anyone have any experience with this product? Recommend or not....???

cx
05-31-2011, 11:23 AM
Lynn, you can do a search for that product here and get a number of views, both pro and con. Opinions, all.

Some of us are not at all in favor of adding anything but water to a cementitious grout unless the additive is recommended by the grout manufacturer.

But it's certainly up to you what products you elect to use, eh? :)

My opinion; worth price charged.

Lilmiss3
05-31-2011, 12:32 PM
Since I don't know how much it costs (just grabbed a brochure when in H.D. yesterday), your response that it's "Worth the price charged" could mean it's not good (if it's inexpensive) 'cuz you get what you pay for, or it could mean you think it's a good value for the money....

Care to be more direct? It is the OPINIONS of everyone here that I desire and value. TIA!

Lilmiss3
05-31-2011, 12:36 PM
I am probably not using the Search tool correctly, but didn't get any results when I tried to do a search on Grout Shield's Additive that eliminates the need for sealing after grouting....

vtaormina
05-31-2011, 04:08 PM
Using thinset. Tile glue has organic compounds which fosters mold growth and a small joint 1/16 or less between tile and the tub = no mold. Corner movement can be avoided by adequately fastening cement board,mud and tape corners. When fixing corner tiles the cut edge should have mortar filling any space on the abutting wall. Any unfilled voids gives tile a chance to move. No of this matters unless framing is done properly.

cx
05-31-2011, 04:23 PM
your response that it's "Worth the price charged" could mean it's not good (if it's inexpensive) 'cuz you get what you pay for, or it could mean you think it's a good value for the money....My regular disclaimer of "worth price charged" refers to my opinion, Lynn, not the product under discussion. :)

I didn't get a lot of result in searching for the product here, but I searched under "grout shield" and saw a few discussions.

When fixing corner tiles the cut edge should have mortar filling any space on the abutting wall.'Fraid I hafta take pretty strong exception to that recommendation, Victor. In tile setting, we don't recommend the tile directly abutting any other solid surface, nor being grouted directly against any such surface. Leaving an open gap or filling it with a flexible sealant are the two most common and acceptable options.

My opinion; worth price charged.

vtaormina
05-31-2011, 05:34 PM
we don't recommend the tile directly abutting any other solid surface, nor being grouted directly against any such surface. Leaving an open gap or filling it with a flexible sealant are the two most common and acceptable options.

and why is that? It is not done as such on old mud jobs. Plaster wall corners don't crack why should tile.

Crestone Tile
05-31-2011, 11:08 PM
Victor,

Many of us who install over mud will argue that it is acceptable to grout changes of plane due to the monolithic nature of a PROPERLY installed mud job (lath continued around corners to next framing member, no cold joints in float, etc.) Even though I have great faith in grouting an inside corner of my showers (and do so frequently), it is still against industry standards along with the instructions of every setting material manufacturer that I'm aware of.

An installation I am extremely careful with when it comes to changes of plane is steamers. Even though I mud them, I still use backer rod to protect the corner joints from being filled with mortar. All changes of plane get siliconed.

Lilmiss3
06-01-2011, 07:25 PM
I have some 'larger' gaps (larger than the 1/8" spacing of the rest of the joints) at some areas up the wall corners where my framing was not the best. There is NO gap larger than 1/4". The majority of them are 3/16".

I know I am to caulk the corner walls (not grout), but here's my issue ~ my friend, a licensed contractor (masonry), who helped by installing my backer board, says I should fill the areas with mortar before caulking (using a grout bag or the like to squeeze it back into the space behind the tile of the side walls). He is concerned about the caulk not getting back in there sufficiently and there being problems with water....

SHOULD I do this? Will the caulk adhere to the mortar? If so, will the caulk work better than if I filled such a 'deep' void with caulk? Or is it O.K. to just caulk the entire gap....???

TIA, SO very much!
~ Lynn

Lilmiss3
06-01-2011, 08:31 PM
I am tiling a shower around a tub. It is a reno job. Old drywall was removed and concrete board was installed, covered with Red Gard waterproofing membrane.

I am done tiling, but before caulking and grouting, I have concerns about some 'larger' gaps (larger than the 1/8" spacing of the rest of the joints) in some areas up the wall corners where my framing was not the best. There is NO gap larger than 1/4". The majority of the areas of concern are 3/16".

I know I am to caulk the corners (not grout), but here's my issue ~ my friend, a licensed contractor (masonry), who helped by installing my backer board, says I should fill the areas with mortar before caulking (using a grout bag or the like to squeeze it back into the space behind the tile of the side walls). He is concerned about the caulk not getting back in there sufficiently and there being water problems in these areas.

My thinking is that some tile jobs (e.g. - saltillo) are often done with grout lines of 1/4", hence those jobs would have corners of caulk/grout of that width and depth, so this is not a matter of concern. He disagrees.

SO - my question: what should I do? If I DO fill the areas with mortar, will the caulk adhere to the mortar? If so, will the caulk work better by filling such a 'deep' void with mortar this way? Or is it O.K. to just caulk the entire gap w/my grout-matched, non-sanded caulk....??? (I still intend on using non-sanded grout, in spite of these minor areas of wider-than-1/8" gaps... maybe THAT is a "No-No," too....???)

TIA, SO very much!
~ Lynn

Houston Remodeler
06-01-2011, 08:32 PM
Lynn,

No. The idea of leaving the thinset and grout out of the corners is to leave room for expansion. If you fill it in with grout as a backer for the caulk, you're defeating the purpose. Leave the gap open. If you have sleepless nights, use a foam backer rod. But I wouldn't Just use 100% silicone and you'll be fine. The caulking from EarthMaster is top notch

read the caulking tutorial (http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=85634) to be ready

muskymike
06-01-2011, 08:52 PM
Hi Lynn, just caulk the corners forcing the caulk into it. It will be fine. What size are the grout joints? :)

Lilmiss3
06-01-2011, 09:58 PM
I really appreciate your response.... and I quite enjoy being RIGHT, too! Can't wait to tell my friend. LOL

Lilmiss3
06-01-2011, 10:02 PM
The grout joints are 1/8" everywhere, except for these few places in the corners (framing issues with my old house) where it varies slightly from the 1/8" to 3/16" on up to a couple of small areas that are as much as 1/4"....

ceramictec
06-01-2011, 10:03 PM
you can easily put caulk in an 1/8" to 1/4" joint

Tool Guy - Kg
06-01-2011, 10:20 PM
Going "by the book", the corners should have zero grout or anything else in them and they should be caulked with a sealant. I will full out disagree with this mason's advice. If the joint is quite large, about the only thing you'd want to fill it with would be backer rod...a material meant to partially fill a joint that is destined to be caulked so that the caulk doesn't fill a huge, oddly shaped void...this allows the caulk bead to remain relatively uniform in shape and perform at a higher level by allowing it to more freely contort to the slightly shifting walls that will be expanding and contracting with changes in temperature and moisture content. But you really don't have that large of joints and I agree with Mike and Brian that you should caulk it without filling it with anything ahead of time.

"Non sanded" caulk (acrylic caulk) has notoriously poor performance in a shower. This is a tub surround, so it will do a little better, but I'd highly suggest switching over to a color matched 100% silicone. 100% silicone will not shrink radically (when it dries) like the acrylic caulk will and will stay permanently flexible, so it will have a far longer life expectancy. If you need advice on where to find a large variety of colors in 100% silicone, give a holler.

:)

bbcamp
06-02-2011, 04:52 AM
The backerrod will serve 2 purposes: 1) creates the proper "hourglass" shape for the caulk, and 2) saves a ton of caulk. A very thick bead or rope of caulk will get hard and stiff in relatively short order, when it will then detatch itself from one of the surfaces it is supposed to seal. When that happens, you might as well not have caulked at all.

Lilmiss3
06-02-2011, 04:55 AM
Bubba, you wrote:
"But you really don't have that large of joints and I agree with Mike and Brian that you should caulk it without filling it with anything ahead of time.

"Non sanded" caulk (acrylic caulk) has notoriously poor performance in a shower. This is a tub surround, so it will do a little better, but I'd highly suggest switching over to a color matched 100% silicone. 100% silicone will not shrink radically (when it dries) like the acrylic caulk will and will stay permanently flexible, so it will have a far longer life expectancy. If you need advice on where to find a large variety of colors in 100% silicone, give a holler."

I've been to my local, big name home improvement stores, as well as one of the largest tile suppliers (wholesale and to the public), and what they all carry are brands of sanded and non-sanded siliconized acrylic latex caulks. [Wait, though, I'm looking at the site for Polyblend (CustomBuildingProducts.com), and they say their caulk is silicone... not siliconIZED, so I'll investigate further. The color I REALLY like is their brand, but I'm not finding the non-sanded version.... but, wait - if it comes in sanded versus non-sanded, does that mean it's NOT 100% silicone...???] I'm getting so confused about the whole caulk thing....

O.K. ~ I guess I need advice on where to find a large variety of colors in 100% silicone that I can color-match to my grout. I still want NON-sanded grout, right....???

Also, do I grout first THEN caulk, or caulk THEN grout....???

So many questions.... so little time to finish TILING! LOL

Lilmiss3
06-02-2011, 04:57 AM
What is a backerrod, where do I get it, and how do I install it?

bbcamp
06-02-2011, 05:02 AM
It's a closed cell foam product that you are likely to find it in with the weatherstripping supplies. Get the size that is just a hair larger than the gap you want to fill. Push it in, let friction hold it. The top surface of the rod should be about 1/3 the tile thickness from the surface of the tile. You may have to split a piece, but it is easy to cut with a utility knife.

Lilmiss3
06-02-2011, 05:13 AM
Earthmaster does not have distributors for their products where I live (AZ). I'd already e-mailed them and asked, based on the high recommendations their products have here in this forum. It seems that Custom (the line carried by Home Depot) IS 100% silicone after all, but I'm confused - the bottles say either "Sanded" or "Non-sanded" on them. Does silicone caulk come in either sanded or non-sanded....??? I was told non-sanded does not hold-up well in water areas, but I was under the assumption that I wanted NON-sanded, since I'm using non-sanded GROUT....

If I can use the SANDED caulk with my NON-sanded grout, and get it at Home Depot, then everything will be peachy-keen, 'cuz Custom makes the grout color I LOVE (Haystack), but I can only find the caulk in sanded....

This is THE most confusing thing, in my opinion....

muskymike
06-02-2011, 06:27 AM
Hi Lynn, if you are using unsanded grout you want unsanded caulk. I caulk after I grout. :)

Houston Remodeler
06-02-2011, 06:44 AM
Be careful when buying at HD. not ALL the cbp caulk sold there is silicone. Most of it is latex

Lilmiss3
06-02-2011, 10:13 AM
"Non sanded" caulk (acrylic caulk) has notoriously poor performance in a shower. This is a tub surround, so it will do a little better, but I'd highly suggest switching over to a color matched 100% silicone. 100% silicone will not shrink radically (when it dries) like the acrylic caulk will and will stay permanently flexible, so it will have a far longer life expectancy. If you need advice on where to find a large variety of colors in 100% silicone, give a holler.
__________________
Tonto Goldstein….. but my friends call me Bubba

SO - where can I buy a variety of colored 100% silicone caulk, that can be color-matched to my grout, in Mesa, AZ????

Lilmiss3
06-02-2011, 11:08 AM
Apparently, there's NOWHERE in AZ where you can buy color-matched, 100% silicone caulk. Seriously. Custom has it now, to match their grouts, but there's not a single store in AZ that carries it yet (per the folks at Custom). I've called every specialty tile place that serves the pros here, and they all wanted to convince me that their siliconized latex was fine, since it's fine for the pros. I'm waiting to hear back from Bob here, 'cuz he said to ask him if I wanted a list of where to get the stuff.... but, it's looking like I'll be ordering GroutMatch from Earth Masters on-line and waiting for it to ship.

SO - while I'm waiting, one more question: I know I'll be caulking straight down each corner where the walls meet (where the planes change), but should I caulk out INTO the adjoining walls a bit, too? If so, how far....???

I'm going to go ahead and grout first, since I'm having to wait for the silicone caulk to arrive, so I need to know where to stop.....

THANKS, guys!!! ~Lynn

cx
06-02-2011, 12:32 PM
Lynn, call the nice folks at EarthMaster and tell Scott we sent you and you want really fast shipping on your GroutMatch product. Tell him you'll make a big stink on the forum if you don't get it plenty quick. Is good people there. :)

Clean the grout nice and straight on both sides of that vertical joint so your caulk joint will be very clean and uniform. The caulk does not need to go beyond that joint at all.

My opinion; worth price charged.

Tool Guy - Kg
06-04-2011, 10:12 AM
I haven't used the "EarthMaster" stuff that others have talked about. I have reservations on mixing grout powder into a silicone and altering the ability of the silicone to remain as flexible as it was without the grout powder, but I have only some advice of technical people as my basis for a concern. It may be a very fine product...just no direct knowledge with it yet. :)

Laticrete's Latisil (http://www.laticrete.com/architects/products/caulk/latasil.aspx) is my first choice and is some seriously high quality stuff. Take a look over on the right side of this page for the "The Installer's Source" link. They'll have it.

Color Rite (http://colorriteinc.com/) makes ColorSil (a 100% silicone) in 44 different stock colors. Call them and tell them what color and brand grout you're using and they'll use their cross reference charts to tell you if they have a match for you.

Tec makes AccuColor 100® 100% Silicone Sealant (http://www.tecspecialty.com/content/products.aspx?product_id=139) to match 21 of their grout colors. If this interests you, do a Google search of "AccuColor 100® 100% Silicone" to find yourself a place to purchase from.

"The Tile Shop" sells NuFlex 302 100% silicone (http://www.tileshop.com/installationproducts/adhesives/silicon/Silicone-Caulk/883.aspx) in a few colors. Just a few, though. Take a look at this The Tile Shop (http://www.tileshop.com/index.aspx) link and look in the upper right hand corner for a store locator link if this interests you. They'll ship to you.

Hope one of these helps.

:)

Houston Remodeler
06-04-2011, 10:20 AM
Add one more vote for Earthmaster (http://www.earthmasterproducts.com/).

Tool Guy - Kg
06-04-2011, 08:41 PM
Paul, you already gave your recommendation for Earthmaster in post #25. :bonk:

Paul, the Laticrete guys say that yeah, you could add "Part C" of SpectraLOCK to their clear silicone to color your own caulk, but it does reduce the flexibility and to not expect the same high performance with plain Latisil. Have you had a chance to do any testing on how flexible this Earthmaster stuff is...or heard anything about this concern?

Lilmiss3
06-04-2011, 10:23 PM
Wanting you guys' feedback on 511's Spray-On Grout Sealer...??? Is it as good as a sealer that you'd brush on....??? I already have a couple of cans leftover from a tiling project I did in the hallway of my school last summer (I'm a teacher), but don't know about it for my shower...???

Lilmiss3
06-05-2011, 06:35 AM
Wanting feedback on 511's Spray-On Grout Sealer... Does it work as well as a sealer that you'd brush on? I already have a couple of cans leftover from a tiling project I did in the hallway of my school last summer (I'm a teacher), but I want to make sure I'm using a high quality product for my shower at home that I just reno'd.

Thanks! ~Lynn

cx
06-05-2011, 06:55 AM
Lynn, starting new threads with duplicate questions frequently results in confusion and duplication of effort on the part of our all-volunteer army of helpers. We'd prefer you didn't do that. The response time during the hours of midnight and seven AM on weekends can be a little slow and we ask for your patience. :)

Don't know anything about that particular spray, but we do know some spray sealers are somewhat hazardous to your health and others are just not likely to be as effective as a brush or roll on. Perhaps someone from Miracle will weigh in here.

You can use whatever you like, of course.

My opinion; worth price charged.

Lilmiss3
06-05-2011, 07:14 AM
The caulk I have says: "Wait a [I]minimum[I] of 7 days before exposing to intermittent water." This is for a shower renovation, and we've already gone for 7 days with having to wash our hair in the kitchen sink and only take baths. I don't think my 16 year old son is going to last any longer....

Is it really necessary to wait that long...???

bbcamp
06-05-2011, 07:26 AM
Let's see... you both are clean and living indoors, so neither of you are in any sort of danger by waiting. However, the caulk manufacturer thinks his product may be harmed by exposure to water within 7 days of application. Seems like your choice is to risk damage to your caulk, pick a caulk that allows you to hose it down right away, or wait.

Your 16 year old son will survive these horrible conditions. ;) If you want to really stress him, take away his keys and cell phone for 7 days.

bbcamp
06-05-2011, 07:29 AM
You can delete your own posts within a few days of making it. After that, one of the mods will have to do it for you.

Lilmiss3
06-05-2011, 07:30 AM
I can NOT believe we've got to wait another 7 days....

I tried to get this done while my son was on vacation with his dad. He went 2 days before he left without access to the shower while it was being gutted, and he ended-up going to his dad's to shower 'cuz he refuses to take a bath. I don't think he has taken a bath since I gave him one when he was a toddler. LOL

I'm getting pretty tired of washing my hair in the kitchen sink, too....

cx
06-05-2011, 07:34 AM
We prefer that posts not be deleted anyway, Lynn, as it makes subsequent posts confusing for future readers, eh? :)

bbcamp
06-05-2011, 07:37 AM
Lynn, you son doesn't have to take a bath. Or wash his hair. His choice, and he's big enough to live with the consequences. It does sound like he needs to grow up a little. Not that it's any of my bidness, of course. ;)

Again, your choices are to switch caulks, follow the manufacturer's instructions for the caulk you have, or use your shower right away and hope for the best.

Tool Guy - Kg
06-05-2011, 09:17 AM
I'm with Bob. There are many more difficult things in this world we all could be exposed to than being restricted on taking showers for another week.

From the timing of this, you're getting it done pretty quickly. Most DIY'ers would have needed longer than the week you've managed to get this done thus far. You should be proud of your efforts. :tup2:

You said in your opening post that this was a tub surround that you've tiled (this suggestion doesn't apply to a full shower stall). If you must, grab yourself a piece of plastic 7' tall and 10' wide. Hang it from the three adjacent walls in the tub with the bottom draping into the tub. It will keep the walls dry during showers. I'd pull it away from the walls while you weren't showering to allow air to circulate freely.

:)

Lilmiss3
06-05-2011, 03:11 PM
I'll tell my son that Bob on JohnBridge.com says he needs to grow up a bit. LOL
He IS the baby (youngest of three boys), but it's really ME who doesn't want to live with HIM not showering for 7 days.... trust me, HE'd be totally fine with it. :loaded:

I grew up in rural Iowa.... and I mean RURAL (nearest neighbors were 15 minutes away by car; nearest town was an hour away). Our house and well was once struck by lightening; we went without ANY running water in the house for SIX WEEKS! But, my son's a city boy, born and raised.... I do my best to give him a taste of 'the real world,' but there's only so much you can do. LOL

Thanks for the compliment, ToolGuy. This is not my first tiling job (have actually had people pay me to install tile for them), but this IS my first tub surround, which of course has it's own unique set of needs from a kitchen backsplash, a floor, a fireplace surround, etc. But, I don't think I would've made it through this project without this forum and THE HELP OF ALL OF YOU! :tup1: Thanks SO very much, guys!

I'll post a picture when completely done...
~ Lynn

Lilmiss3
06-10-2011, 11:46 AM
The fixtures are installed, and while I'm removing an old wallpaper border along the ceiling, preparing to re-paint, I've taken some pics of the completed shower while waiting 'til Sunday evening to actually USE it! :wave::wave:

I'm very pleased with the final results! Thanks SO VERY MUCH to ALL!
((Hugs)) ~ Lynn

bbcamp
06-10-2011, 12:54 PM
Looks great, Lynn! It'll be worth the wait!

Lilmiss3
06-11-2011, 06:31 AM
Don't shoot me, but I ended up using siliconized acrylic latex caulk by Spectrum. This is only at the changes in plane (wall corners and along the tub). BUT, based on what I'd read here, I did NOT seal the caulk - just the grout - only as water was turned on for testing while installing the fixtures and cleaning the tub, the caulk areas get REALLY WET looking and STAY that way for quite a while (as opposed to the sealed grout, the water just runs off and it doesn't change appearance at all).

Should I seal the caulk, or not....???

bbcamp
06-11-2011, 06:47 AM
Don't seal the caulk. The caulk won't take the sealer, and it doesn't need to.

As for your choice of caulk: Don't worry about it. Just keep an eye on it and when it starts to degrade, schedule a road trip for the boy (:D ), and re-caulk it. He'll probably be in college or the Army before that needs to be done, though.

Lilmiss3
06-11-2011, 07:00 AM
He's been taking baths, actually! Shocked the hell outta me! LOL

bbcamp
06-11-2011, 07:03 AM
:eek:

Lilmiss3
06-11-2011, 07:09 AM
I KNOW, Bob! Who'dathunkit? :yipee: