Getting started... [Archive] - Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

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JivnJT
09-24-2001, 04:22 PM
Hello, got some questions for yall. My wife and I just bought a small house in Northern Colorado, built in 1952. I just yanked up all the carpet in the living room, dining room, and bedrooms because it had all the original wood floors underneath. Unfortunately the kitchen is carpeted and the laundry room has some really old linolium (sp?). We need to install a new water heater and get the washer and dryer in but I am trying to figure out if it is possible to tile the laundry room and kitchen.. financially and structurally speaking.. before I put those things in the room. So, first things first.

1. The house does have a crawl space but it does NOT go underneath the kitchen or laundry room. The door for the crawl space is located in the laundry room but other than that the entire floor (in both areas) feels solid. I am not sure but it might just be cement underneath those rooms. I did pull up the carpet in the kichen and it appears the wood floor extends into the kitchen but it is not finished AND it has this black tar looking stuff. Can someone tell me how I should be checking or what I should do about a subfloor? Also, what about the crawl space door. Should I tile it also which I am not sure is possible since it is just made out of ply wood and it has to be light enough to lift,

2. Can someone give me the types of tiles I should be looking at that are cost effective and look good? My wife and I like natural tones so tiles that resemble rocks (don't know if that made sense or not). Can someone also give me an appsoximate cost per square foot?

Thanks! JT

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John Bridge
09-24-2001, 04:49 PM
Welcome aboard, JT. The folks here can answer all your questions, probably not all at once, though. Northern Colorado, eh? I have a few words of advice on that note. Relocate further south. It's too cold up there. ;)

Here in Houston it's very common for wood floors to have been built above concrete slabs. The hot tar is spread and 2x4s are laid flat in it very close together. Then the flooring boards, oak or whatever, are nailed to the 2x4s, which are called "screeds" here. In other parts of the country they're called "sleepers."

A floor built in that fashion is extremely strong. Zero deflection, for our purposes.

I'll wait for others to comment.

JivnJT
09-24-2001, 04:56 PM
John --

Actually, its funny you would say that. I grew up in the might town of Houston, Alief to be exact. Went to Alief Elsik High School and moved to Colorado about 5 years ago... and, besides the awesome food, great people, my friends, and family I don't miss a thing.

JT

John Bridge
09-24-2001, 05:03 PM
Oh no, I was just kidding. I'm from the Seattle area. We manage to go there for a couple weeks each summer. It's God's Country. I just hate the winters.

Most of the floors I was describing I've run into in the Bellaire/Sharpstown area. I still encounter them though in the high-end houses we work on. I'm working on a "castle" right now in the Memorial area. All the harwood floors have been done that way.

Hope someone else shows up. This is like "instant messaging." :D

JivnJT
09-24-2001, 05:10 PM
Funny... it is such a small world. I just played Golf at Sharpstown this last spring. I have some really good friends that live in Bellaire so I know what you mean when you say "High-end" homes. They are not small... neither are the ones in Memorial.

John Bridge
09-25-2001, 05:12 PM
JT, I'm posting here to send this baby back to the top of the list where the others might see it. Maybe we'll have to say something like "BEER" to get some attention. ;)

flatfloor
09-25-2001, 05:41 PM
Beer, Beer , where, where?

JT, don't mind me, I don't know tile, this is nervous energy, I quit smoking and I'm all over the place.

Bud Cline
09-27-2001, 03:42 PM
JT,

JT: I am not sure but it might just be cement underneath those rooms.

We need to know.

JT: ...it has this black tar looking stuff.

This (black) is more than likely what is called "cutback adhesive" it's no big deal.

JT: Can someone tell me how I should be checking or what I should do about a subfloor?

What is the makeup and thickness of your existing subfloor materials if you are not on concrete? What size are your floor joists if you are not on concrete? What is the spacing of the floor joists?

JT: Also, what about the crawl space door. Should I tile it also which I am not sure is possible since it is just made out of ply wood and it has to be light enough to lift,

Can you abandon this access and create a new one in another location?

You can tile this also so that it would be removable but it does create some problems.

JT: Can someone give me the types of tiles I should be looking at that are cost effective and look good? My wife and I like natural tones so tiles that resemble rocks (don't know if that made sense or not). Can someone also give me an appsoximate cost per square foot?

JT there are thousands of tile designs and colors available to you. We don't sell tile here we install it. You and your wife should visit some tile showrooms and choose something you like and is in your price range. I would suggest you look at the many porcelain tiles on todays market, porcelain is the "hot ticket" now days. If you want rocks porcelain has it.

Do you intend to do this yourself?