Rubber flooring and wind-generated electricity [Archive] - Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

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Kirk Downey
09-09-2001, 08:38 PM
This is Kirk in Montebello. I've got an interresting question to put to you guys who really know what works. You know because you have to repair what don't stick.

My friend is a retired architect. Lyman is his name. He is trying to adhere an automotive timing belt onto the inside of a laminated veneer (plywood) ring. He is using the plywood ring on a wind-powered electical generator. I told him that there are "rubber" floor tiles being used now a days.

Here's my question: Would the adhesives used to adhere rubber tiles to floors, work to glue what is virtually a tire onto the floor? Would we use a flooring type trowelable membrane to prepare the plywood for the adhesive?

The timing belts need sheer strength and some tensile strength.
This is a preliminary question hoping to elicit a series of questions to take to Lyman and the timing belt mfgr.

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Bud Cline
09-09-2001, 09:04 PM
Contact cement.

We use plain ole garden variety contact cement to adhere rubber and vinyl transitions all the time. There is also a "pressure sensitive" adhesive used for VCT (vinyl composition tile) that will stick to almost anything, just look in the back of my truck sometimetime.

The last time I installed rubber flooring the pressure sensitive adhesive was used if I remember correctly.

John Bridge
09-10-2001, 05:52 AM
Hi Kirk, How ya doin?

I mean no disrespect to your friend, but a wood cylinder with a rubber belt glued to it?

Bud, where's that picture of ole Rube?

flatfloor
09-10-2001, 03:28 PM
Man certainly writes an eye catching thread title.

Better get Ol Sparky over here.

Kirk Downey
09-10-2001, 06:50 PM
John - would that be Rube Goldberg? We're dating ourselves, eh?
flatfloor - I went to extra years college and read heaping volumes of literature for thousands of dollars - I better know how to write snappy phrases. Please send checks to help me recoup that dubious investment in my brain.

The timming belt is a flexible gear with the teeth on the inside. We're going to cut a few of the gears and put them inside Lyman's ring. The teeth will mesh with three gears: one guide and two generators. The 6 foot diameter wooden ring is for the 1/4 scale model and doesn't need to survive weather for long. The actual wind generator would have a metal ring supporting about twenty airfoils (wings) that catch thet wind and spin the ring. We need to adhere the gears (timing belts) to the model.

Someone posting to another forum observes that the irregular thickness of the adhesive may interfere with the gears, but Lyman is not that concerned with the tolerances.

John Bridge
09-10-2001, 07:12 PM
Kirk,

Don't get me wrong. I know you college boys are smart. You didn't say it was a model. I thought you expected it to go the distance. And I date myself every morning when I get up by looking in the mirror. :D Just kidding, buddy.

Contact cement, though, really doesn't vary too much in thickness when you're dealing with wooden parts.

Kirk Downey
09-11-2001, 12:09 AM
John -
I have never been thin skinned - was damn skiney as a kid - so no need to apologize.
College kids smart - whew, not quite - after I finished university I was working as a Rodman for a surveyor for about six months. One day while the surveyor was doing his calculations,(math that was and still is way over my head) he asked me what I studied in college an I told him "Literature." He pondered a moment then looked me dead in the eye scratching the stubble on his cheek and he asked:
"So what does poetry pay nowadays?"
"Don't pay shit, thats' why I'm here."
Had to quit that job after we had a survey on a lot that went all the way up a hill. There was one point right in the middle of a poison oak patch that was thirty feet across. I used to be so alergic that if I walked down wind of a big patch on hot day, I'd get a little somewhere.

Nothin' smart about taking "litracher" when I shoulda taken engineering or somethin folks pay money for. Art is a great humanizing force, but ya gotta eat.
Kirk