removing old shower drain [Archive] - Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

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jazzblue
08-27-2001, 03:51 AM
I have a 30+ year old shower that I have removed the base and all the tiling, etc. I can't find a way to get the old drain unscrewed or pulled off of the pvc pipe. Without having to pull up the plywood and cut the pipe, does anyone know of a way to get the drain off. Are there chemicals that'll eat the glue? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks!!
-Jason

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John Bridge
08-27-2001, 06:40 AM
Hi Jason,

The only way is to cut the pipe. PVC glue actually welds the parts together -- it melts the surface of the pieces.

jazzblue
08-27-2001, 07:46 AM
I can fully turn the drain and the pipe doesn't turn, but it still won't come off. Should I just give in and get the saw out?

John Bridge
08-27-2001, 03:07 PM
What kind of drain is it? Does it look something like this?

http://partners.oatey.com/assets/subcategories/OAT_DRN_SDT_SDR.gif

If it's twisting, pull harder. Otherwise, get the saw. It's not a big deal. You use a straight coupling and a short piece of pipe (nipple). And then you're ready for the new drain.

This drain is from Oatey. http://www.oatey.com

jazzblue
08-27-2001, 08:50 PM
It's not like the Oatey kind. It's an old metal one that has a lip that went over the tub bottom for the seal and then under the lip it has two large washers and extends about 1.5 inches down the pvc pipe. I figured I'm just going to have to cut it and the pvc isn't a problem. It's just cutting the plywood to get to the pipe and then replacing the wood that is going to be a headache.
Thanks for all your help! Your forum is excellent!
-Jason

Rob Z
08-27-2001, 10:39 PM
Jason

Do you have a shower base (aka shower receptor), or did you have a shower pan (tile + mortar+ pan liner) on the floor?

If you have a shower base, then let me know if there is a gasket around the pipe OR a solid seal such as lead.

Rob

jazzblue
08-27-2001, 11:25 PM
There was a shower base which has been removed so now there's just the drain and the plywood around it.
The drain looks like steel and is around 1.5-2 inches from the bottom to the top. I have removed the cap of the drain so I can see straight down the pipe. I thought there was normally a bar going across which the cap connected to, but there isn't. I tried to make a diagram of what i'm looking at. The drain is below and the pvc just goes up into that.

_________
| | <--drain w/ lip that extends 1/2" over shower base
| |
| | <--pvc pipe going up into drain


I know this probably won't make sense, but I'm in the process of taking a pic.

Rob Z
08-28-2001, 09:22 PM
Jason


If this drain has a "no lead" gasket, you can probably drive the pipe out of the gasket with a blunt stick such as a dowel and a hammer.

Put the dowel on the edge of the pipe and tap with the hammer. Move the dowel around the perimeter of the pipe as you are tapping.

Most of the time, this will drive the pipe back out of the rubber gasket.

Rob

jazzblue
08-30-2001, 12:51 PM
I got it off!!! I cut a small hole in the plywood subfloor and used a hacksaw to slice the drain and was then able to yank it off. The piping is in great shape so I don't need to replace it.
I do have another problem now. The original shower had ceramic tiles attached to drywall. I have taken all the tile and drywall down and in the process of putting up new cement backerboard. The problem is that the backerboard is 1/2" and the drywall was slightly thicker so I have 1/8" difference where the two meet. Do you know of any type of filler/underlayment that I can put down to gradually make that 1/8" difference unnoticeable? The last thing I want to do is to replace the whole bathroom with new drywall.
Any help would be greatly appreciated!!!
-Jason

John Bridge
08-30-2001, 03:32 PM
Jason,

If you're talking about outside the shower area you can use drywall mud (joint compound). Inside the shower you can build out an eighth of an inch with thin set.

Bud Cline
08-30-2001, 05:03 PM
Jason,

I think your saying your shower wall now stands proud of your existing sheetrock walls by 1/8". John is correct use joint compound to fill and feather that recess. You may have to feather 20 inches or so to make the change-up go away (typical). If it was me I would use 90 minute mud to fill and feather, it won't shrink as much as joint compound (garden variety) and can be done in two passes maybe.