Need to finish granite edge ???? [Archive] - Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

PDA

View Full Version : Need to finish granite edge ????


Lynch
04-28-2006, 08:14 AM
One of my sidesplashes for granite vanity top broke (of course it was the needed side that broke), so I'll use the other side splash but the edge that shows is unfinished. How do you polish the edge to shine like the rest of it ?
(I have belt sander, orbit sander)
How can I do this myself so I can finish my vanity ??
Thanks guys

Sponsored Links


John Bridge
04-28-2006, 08:37 AM
Hi Lynch, Welcome aboard. :)

Please throw a first name up here.

Both your sanders will be too hard to control for something small like this. I would do it by hand. It will take you a while, but it'll be right. Use sandpaper and cloth in accending grits (the numbers get larger as the grits get smaller). Start with 60 grit sand paper and work your way down. Switch to wet/dry paper/cloth at about 300 and work you way down to about 800. You just need to finish one end, right?

mrbreakit
04-28-2006, 09:37 AM
You can use aluminum oxide or silicon carbide paper, but it is tedious work. There are diamond polishing kits available that the pros use. It's still a multi-step process from coarse to fine.

Garnet paper won't scratch granite, which is handy to know if you ever have to sand something (like wood trim) next to a polished granite surface and don't want to scratch the granite.

A local granite place might also do the job for you, but many don't do little jobs. I found a local place that does, and they are going to get all my granite business from now on. The place that laughed at me when I wanted an edge polished has been deleted from my files.

DonB
04-28-2006, 10:15 AM
Garnet paper won't scratch granite, which is handy to know if you ever have to sand something (like wood trim) next to a polished granite surface and don't want to scratch the granite.

I wouldn't put that one in the bank. Industrial garnet has a moh of up to 7.5 and I'm not aware of a granite much over 7. Pesonally, I have no problem cutting various granites with garnet.

Don

Lynch
04-28-2006, 10:18 AM
Hey John, first name's Greg. Yes, it's one small end 4" high- that's it !
How long with each grit, what am I looking for in order to get that shine- is it just a matter of sanding by hand, no liquid product- just paper ??
I'm a painter and furniture maker so I'm quite familiar with sanding !! But is that all there is to it- when do I progress to finer grits ? Thank you

mrbreakit
04-28-2006, 11:24 AM
I wouldn't put that one in the bank. Industrial garnet has a moh of up to 7.5 and I'm not aware of a granite much over 7. Pesonally, I have no problem cutting various granites with garnet.

I'm sure you are right about that. I made a granite table trimmed in wood and noticed that regular garnet paper didn't affect the polished surface of the granite. Maybe it was a lucky combination of 6.5 garnet and 7.0 baltic brown.

Brian in San Diego
04-28-2006, 12:07 PM
Greg,

I have a bit of experience with polishing and bullnosing, however, I use a VS grinder with dry pads. With the sanding, you'll "feel" it when it's time to move down to the next grit. I know with the pads, after a few passes I know that it's time to move to the next and so on. If you have a piece of scrap tile, you may want to practice on it. But from your experience with sanding wood, I'm confident that you'll know when it's time to move on.

Brian

Rhode Island Flooring
04-28-2006, 12:10 PM
I found a good site with diamond polishing pads!!!! cheap too.
http://www.mcgillswarehouse.com/ItemDetails.aspx?ItemID=120110170

Lynch
04-28-2006, 02:14 PM
ok guys, I'll give it a shot, but one thing I didn't ask is how you get it to shine ? Once I get to really fine paper will it start shining ?

Brian in San Diego
04-28-2006, 04:31 PM
Greg,

Using the dry diamond pads I'm shining at about the 1500 grit. I then proceed to 3000 and buff. I don't know how fine sand paper comes. If it were me I think I'd try the finest wet sand paper available. But the short answer is that it'll shine when you get the grit fine enough.

Brian

David Edwards
04-28-2006, 08:21 PM
You can also contact companies such as GranQuartz (www.granquartz.com) and Granite City Tool (www.granitecitytool.com (Ithink)). They can set you up with hand-held diamond abrasive blocks that are made for exactly what you need (along with polishing corners or near sink edges without removing the sink.)

Brian is right... you can tell by the feel when it's time to move on -- IF you've done it several times before or IF you pay very close attention to the feel when you first begin and as it progresses. Otherwise, try this...

Get a scrap granite tile from somewhere. Take each grit of your abrasive and make a few small circles on a small part of the tile. The point of this is to make yourself a visual reference for the scratch pattern of each grit (size of scratches). The main thing you want to pay attention to before moving on to the next higher grit is that you have removed ALL the scratches left by the previous grit. Look at your surface under a light from various angles and just make sure. Once you are sure of your scratch pattern, move on.

Why is this important? Say you started with a 60 grit, then move on to 120 grit. If you leave even one or two scratches from the 60, your third (220 grit) and future grits will not remove the 60 grit scratches, and you'll end up with that (or those) spot(s) being duller and/or cloudy. If that happens, your only choice is to drop back to 120 grit and work your way back up. Just take your time and be thorough with each step.